Justinian II


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Justinian II

n
(Biography) 669–711 ad, Byzantine emperor (685–95, 705–11). Banished (695) after a revolt against his oppressive rule, he regained the throne with the help of the Bulgars. He was killed in a second revolt
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References in periodicals archive ?
The author notes in passing (225n60) that Emperor Justinian II was nicknamed Rhinotmetos, which means "sliced nose" because he was mutilated after he was deposed the first time in an attempt to keep him from reascending the imperial throne (he had a golden prosthetic made and returned to power anyway).
The Pussy Riot trial was, of course, a travesty of justice, with the prosecution quoting the canons of the Quinisext Council, which took place in Constantinople in 692, under Byzantine Emperor Justinian II. The supposed victims of the Pussy Riot "prayer" -- mainly the security guards -- testified that they could not sleep after witnessing the performance.
Among their topics are sources of spiritual truthfulness in late antique texts and life, the boundaries of orthodoxy in the works of Athansius and John of Ephesus, the emergence of martyrs' shrines in late antique Iran, imperial patronage of icons from Justinian II to Leo III, the Saint Syrus dossier and hagiography as an instrument for political claims in Carolingian northern Italy, and hagiography and authority in ninth-century Francia.
Nach ihrer Einberufung durch den byzantinischen Kaiser Justinian II. tagte die Synode unter Teilnahme von 220 Bischofen im Kuppelsaal (<<trullos>>, Kuppel) des Kaiserpalastes zu Konstantinopel.
Emperor Justinian II convoked the council ten years after the sixth ecumenical council (Constantinople III, 680-681), which had been wholly occupied with Monothelitism just as the fifth ecumenical council (Constantinople II, 553) was concerned entirely with questions of faith raised by the "Three Chapters." Neither of these two councils had dealt with matters of discipline.
Art experts said the restoration rendered the cross much closer to what it would have looked like at the time the Byzantine Emperor Justinian II gave it to the people of Rome.