juvenile hormone

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juvenile hormone

n.
Any of several hormones in insects that regulate various physiological processes, especially larval development and reproduction.

juvenile hormone

n
(Biochemistry) a hormone, secreted by insects from a pair of glands behind the brain, that promotes the growth of larval characteristics and inhibits metamorphosis

ju′venile hor′mone


n.
any of a class of insect hormones acting to inhibit the molting of an immature insect into its adult form.
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Juvenile hormones (JHs) are important in insect life and have a dual function: in juvenile forms as status quo hormones, and in adults they show a number of regulatory tactics.
Effects of ecdysteroid agonist RH-2485 reveal interactions between ecdysteroids and juvenile hormones in the development of Sesamia nonagrioides.
Granger, "The juvenile hormones," in Comprehensive Molecular Insect Science, L.
Production of male neonates in Daphnia magna (Cladocera, Crustacea) exposed to juvenile hormones and their analogs.
Juvenile hormones and juvenoids; modeling biological effects and environmental fate.
Juvenile hormones regulate metamorphosis and the quality of molting in insects (Riddiford & Evans 1994).
Washington, August 5 (ANI): A new study has demonstrated that programmed cell death - a process by which cells deliberately destroy themselves - is key to termite evolution wherein they molt from workers, to presoldiers and finally soldiers under the effect of juvenile hormones.
Pyriproxifen mimics the action of the juvenile hormones in a number of physiological processes and is a potent inhibitor of embryo-genesis, metamorphosis, and adult formation (Glancey et al.
There is also material on current research in biosynthesis inhibitors of insect chitin, juvenile hormones of insects and their analogs, and methods for researching insecticides.
Biologists hope to recapture the oldest kits before their juvenile hormones stimulate them to disperse.
55) This "chemical castration" is rarely prescribed for juvenile sex offenders because of issues of informed consent, medical supervision, and the fluctuation of juvenile hormones.

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