quiche

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Related to K'iche: Quiché

Qui·ché

 (kē-chā′)
n. pl. Quiché or Qui·chés
1. A member of a Mayan people of Guatemala.
2. The Mayan language of the Quiché.

quiche

 (kēsh)
n.
A rich unsweetened custard pie, often containing ingredients such as vegetables, cheese, or seafood.

[French, from German dialectal Küche, diminutive of German Kuchen, cake; see kuchen.]

quiche

(kiːʃ)
n
(Cookery) an open savoury tart with a rich custard filling to which bacon, onion, cheese, etc, are added: quiche Lorraine.
[French, from German Kuchen cake]

quiche


(kēsh),
n.
a pie containing unsweetened custard baked with other ingredients, as cheese, meat, or onions.
[1945–50; < French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Quiche - a member of the Mayan people of south central Guatemala
Maya, Mayan - a member of an American Indian people of Yucatan and Belize and Guatemala who had a culture (which reached its peak between AD 300 and 900) characterized by outstanding architecture and pottery and astronomy; "Mayans had a system of writing and an accurate calendar"
2.quiche - a tart filled with rich unsweetened custard; often contains other ingredients (as cheese or ham or seafood or vegetables)
quiche Lorraine - quiche made with cheese and bacon
tart - a small open pie with a fruit filling
3.Quiche - the Mayan language spoken by the Quiche
Mayan language, Maya, Mayan - a family of American Indian languages spoken by Maya
Translations

quiche

[kiːʃ] Nquiche m

quiche

[ˈkiːʃ] nquiche f
a mushroom quiche → une quiche aux champignons

quiche

nQuiche f

quiche

[kiːʃ] nquiche f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
NATALIA, A K'ICHE speaking Indigenous woman from Guatemala, learned to farm pineapples when she was a refugee in Mexico.
Archeological studies have found evidence of the first human settlers in Guatemala dating back as early to 12,000 BC and the existence of corn cultivation developed as early as 3500 BC, but even though coffee cultivation cannot be traced back this long, most historical accounts agree that Antigua was one of the first sources of coffee production in the county And in the country named "a place of many trees" Guatemala, of which its name and meaning comes from a mixture of the indigenous languages Nahuad and the Mayan dialect known as K'iche, both Antigua and Atidan were also among the first five regions to be included in Anacafe's coffee map.
De Latinoamerica, se reunen estudios del ya mencionado texto anonimo Maya K'iche, Popol Wuj (Guatemala), de la poesia de Augusto Roa Bastos (guarani, Paraguay), Calixta Gabriel (maya kaqchikel, Guatemala) y Jaime Huenun (mapuche, Chile), de la narrativa de Jose Maria Arguedas (quechua, Peru) y del texto oral de Lazaro Poot, transcrito por Manuel J.