thermal conductivity

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thermal conductivity

n.
A measure of the ability of a material to allow the flow of heat from its warmer surface through the material to its colder surface, determined as the heat energy transferred per unit of time and per unit of surface area divided by the temperature gradient, which is the temperature difference divided by the distance between the two surfaces (the thickness of the material), expressed in watts per kelvin per meter.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thermal conductivity

n
(General Physics) a measure of the ability of a substance to conduct heat, determined by the rate of heat flow normally through an area in the substance divided by the area and by minus the component of the temperature gradient in the direction of flow: measured in watts per metre per kelvin. Symbol: λ or k Sometimes shortened to: conductivity
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References in periodicals archive ?
Varley and Gradwell (1970) called the factor that largely determines the k value of a given stage "a key factor" if "the variations in [the] k-value [of that stage] contribute most to the variations in K" because this is the factor that "appears to be largely responsible for the observed changes in population" (Morris 1959).
- Life tables may contain an interval in which mortality factors are multiple, difficult to identify and to evaluate individually so that they have to be lumped as a single k value. An example is the well-known "winter disappearance" in the winter moth (Operophtera brumata) life tables ([k.sub.1] in Varley et al.
If we divided the collective mortality into those caused by a number of specific factors, in an effort to find the hidden "key factor," the contribution of each k value to Var(K), hence the resemblance in pattern between [k.sub.1] and K, would have most certainly been reduced, and the "key factor" might have even disappeared.