KGB


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KGB

 (kā′jē-bē′)
n.
The intelligence and internal security agency of the former Soviet Union.

[Russian, from K(omitet) G(osudarstvennoĭ) B(ezopasnosti) : komitet, committee + gosudarstvennoĭ : genitive of gosudarstvennyĭ, of the state + bezopasnosti, genitive of bezopasnost', security.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

KGB

abbreviation for
the former Soviet secret police, founded in 1954. Compare GRU
[from Russian Komitet Gosudarstvennoi Bezopasnosti State Security Committee]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

KGB

or K.G.B.,

the Soviet secret police responsible for intelligence and internal security, formed in l954.
[< Russian, for K(omitét)g(osudárstvennoĭ)b(ezopásnosti) Committee for State Security]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.KGB - formerly the predominant security police organization of Soviet RussiaKGB - formerly the predominant security police organization of Soviet Russia
Russian agency - an administrative agency of the Russian government
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

KGB

N (in former USSR) → KGB f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

KGB

[ˌkeɪdʒiːˈbiː] n abbrKGB m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

KGB

nKGB m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

KGB

[ˌkeɪdʒiːˈbiː] n abbr the KGBil KGB
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
They then imply they have seen Weinstein's latest book reporting his access to KGB files, but give no citation.
They decided that information brought to Britain by KGB defector Vasili Mitrokhin could not be put as evidence to a UK court.
In 1993 Weinstein's publisher paid an organization of former KGB agents an unknown sum of money to grant Weinstein and his collaborator Alexander Vassiliev "substantial and exclusive access to Stalin-era operational files" of the KGB and its predecessors (to avoid confusion, referred to here simply as the KGB).
And how many times have I seen a KGB officer embark on an endless monologue which started with different threats but ended up in telling me his life story.
But when Mature Liar started up in 1982, it really ate into our subscriber base, because it was targeted at senior citizens likely to believe the FBI killed John Kennedy with the aid of the KGB and the little green men.
The Digest said it was Yakunin who provided it with "top secret" KGB documents that, it said, demonstrate KGB efforts to infiltrate and manipulate the WCC.
Anna agrees to undergo intensive training then serve her KGB masters for five years in return for a new life free from violence.
Although the broad outlines of this story would sound familiar to residents of most authoritarian states, Matulaitis was the target of a distinctive KGB tactic known as profilaktika, or "prophylaxis." This tactic was designed to prevent minor political transgressors from turning into habitual critics of the regime by summoning them to "prophylactic chats" and other police-led interventions, where KGB officers (sometimes joined by other citizens) questioned their targets, lectured them about Soviet values, elicited a confession, and warned about tough measures against recidivists.
He was Putin's boss when they both worked in the KGB in Leningrad in the 1970s.
The communists used the church as a KGB tool for spying and reporting on people.