Kabardian


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Kabardian

(kəˈbɑːdɪən)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of a Circassian people of the North West Caucasus
2. (Languages) the Eastern dialect of the Circassian language. Compare Adygei
References in periodicals archive ?
not without N Kabardian m[??]-aq[??][lambda]-[??] -nsa 'not without intelligence' (Colarusso 1992: 150) h.
He thinks that the failure of the "Soviet project to create a separate Adighe, Kabardian and Cherkess identity," "ethnic solidarity of the Circassians in the 14th and 15th century Mamluk Empire," and "survival of Circassian ethnic identity in various Circassian diasporas since the 1860s, despite subjection to the nationalizing policies of the states in which they found themselves" demonstrate that the ethno-symbolist theory of nation explains the Circassian case better (p.
Farther east, we know that Fort Mozdok on the Terek River was built at the request of a Kabardian prince seeking protection against his neighbors; there are other examples in Siberia of local leaders inviting the Russian to build outposts for the same reason.
The main object of the study is leached chernozem a narrow line of which spreads upon a flatland part of foothills along Caucasian mountains and occupies the southern part of foothill plains (Kabardian, Ossetian and Chechen) at the height of 400-600 m above sea level.
This language is spoken by 425,000 speakers mainly in the Russian regions of Krasnodar and Adyghe republic but also in Turkey and other Middle East countries, and jointly with Kabardian constitutes the Abkhazo-Adyghean language family (Northwest Caucasian).
the Kabardian hobby school had 2 students in 2008 and 27 in 2011 (in 2000, 14 Kabardians lived in Estonia), and the Narva Uzbek Sunday School had 7 and 26 students, respectively.
The official Soviet bureaucracy defined them as Adyghean, Cherkess, Kabardian and Shapsough depending on their place of residence and the dialect of the Circassian language spoken.
This is the case in Kabardian (7) where the declarative -s found in (7a) is absent in the PI (7b).
The present writer's contribution is a description of the causative construction in Kabardian, a NW Caucasian language, and of the ways in which this construction interacts with reflexivization.
In an offhand way, he has been known to say about the two chief ethnic groups of his region, "The Balkars and the Kabardians, they're pretty much the same." A Kabardian himself, Akhmed is simply not used to thinking of the world as divided into irreconcilable ethnic units.
According to Hawkins (1983: 119) the pattern [dem N A num] is also found in Kabardian and Warao and the pattern [N A num dem] in Selepet and Yoruba, although it remains to be seen if we are really dealing with simple, integral NPs here.
Unlike Kalmykov, who pled for Kabardian territorial autonomy, El'darkhanov did not approach the central Soviet government with demands for a separate Chechen autonomous region.