Kabardian

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Kabardian

(kəˈbɑːdɪən)
n
1. (Peoples) a member of a Circassian people of the North West Caucasus
2. (Languages) the Eastern dialect of the Circassian language. Compare Adygei
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Dagestan ASSR was essentially an enlarged version of the Dagestan region, which already existed before the 1917 revolution, the Soviet Mountain Republic encompassed the non-Russian peoples living south of the Terek River in the former Terek region--including, in addition to several Cossack communities, Chechens, Ingush, Ossetes, Balkars, Kabardians, and Karachai.
Karl Lander, who then represented the secret police in the North Caucasus, reported in February 1922 that among the mountain peoples, "like the Chechens, the Kabardians, and a part of the Karachai people," who "hitherto [had been] well-disposed" toward them unrest was growing, and that the Chechens had started to carry out ambushes against the oil installations close to Groznyi, "which [had] not [been] the case until now.
According to Voroshilov, who described his impressions in a letter to Stalin on 21 January 1923, the "Chechens were no better or worse than other mountaineers [gortsy]," yet they had more "mullahs, sheikhs, and other devilry [chertovshchina] than others--for example, the Karachai and even the Kabardian peoples," and their "fanaticism, backwardness, and ignorance [were] extraordinary.
46) Already in May 1921, the leader of the Kabardian district, Betal Kalmykov, openly argued that his territory should secede from the Soviet Mountain Republic, and Moscow granted Kabarda the status of an autonomous region in September 1921.
Sochi was historically the capital of an area populated by the Circassians (encompassing the Adyghes, Kabardians, Shapsugs, and Cherkess), peoples of the North Caucasus who speak dialects of the Circassian language.
the Kabardian hobby school had 2 students in 2008 and 27 in 2011 (in 2000, 14 Kabardians lived in Estonia), and the Narva Uzbek Sunday School had 7 and 26 students, respectively.
22) In Kabardino-Balkaria, Balkars regularly complain about the domination of the Kabardians, as do the Cherkess about the Karachai in Karachai-Cherkessia.
The official Soviet bureaucracy defined them as Adyghean, Cherkess, Kabardian and Shapsough depending on their place of residence and the dialect of the Circassian language spoken.
Hungarians, who were partners in the Austrian Empire at the time, were engaged in identity formation as are the Kabardians, who inhabit primarily the Russian Federation's republic of Kabardino-Balkaria, as well as other peoples of the North Caucasus today.
Power grabs flared between Kabardians and Balkars in the first years after the collapse of the Soviet Union, and there have been far more destructive clashes in other parts of the North Caucasus, such as Chechnya, Ingushetia, and Dagestan.
The Kabardians trace their history to great Circassian principalities, and the Balkars to Turkic tribes.
Within these compounds Kabardians first understand the moral and social code they call khabza, which dictates how to behave rightly and with guakach', or "heart talent," and young Muslims learn to wash themselves, cover their heads, and turn to Mecca for their daily prayers.