Kachera


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Kachera

(kʌˈtʃeɪrə) or

Kacha

n
(Clothing & Fashion) short trousers traditionally worn by Sikhs as a symbol of their religious and cultural loyalty: originally worn for ease of horse riding. See also five Ks
[Punjabi]
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References in periodicals archive ?
They include Kesh (uncut hair), Kangha (a wooden comb for the hair), Kara (an iron bracelet), Kachera (100% cotton tieable undergarment) and Kirpan (an iron dagge).
From baptism onwards, every Sikh was to wear five 'kakkaars'--'kesh', 'kanga', 'karha', 'kirpan', 'kachera' at all times.
As stated earlier, the five symbols ('kesh', 'kanga', 'karha', 'kirpan', 'kachera') not only assert the distinctive religious identity of a Sikh, it is through these symbols that Sikh male identity is constructed.
Along with not cutting hair, including facial hair, the other four articles are: to carry a wooden comb, wear a metal bracelet, wear a special Kachera undergarment and lastly to carry a 'Kirpan' curved sword.
These articles of faith are Kesh, Kanga, Kara, Kachera and Kirpan -that translates from Punjabi as uncut hair, which is a gift from god, a wooden comb to keep hair in place under turbans and an iron bracelet, which serves as a reminder to follow a moral code.
They are the Kangha, (a wooden comb) the Kesh, (unshorn hair) the Kara, (the steel bangle), the Kachera (cotton shorts) and the Kirpan (a dagger).
They are 'Kesh' (uncut hair), 'Kanga' (comb), Kara (bracelet), Kachera (a style of cotton underwear) and Kirpan (sword).
. Kara and Kachera are to remind Sikhs of their faith.