kaddish

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Kad·dish

 (kä′dĭsh)
n. Judaism
A prayer recited in the daily synagogue services and by mourners after the death of a close relative.

[From Aramaic qaddiš, holy, sacred, from qədaš, to become holy, be sacred (so called after the first words of the prayer); see qdš in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Kaddish

(ˈkædɪʃ)
n, pl Kaddishim (kæˈdɪʃɪm)
1. (Judaism) an ancient Jewish liturgical prayer largely written in Aramaic and used in various forms to separate sections of the liturgy. Mourners have the right to recite some of these in public prayer during the year after, and on the anniversary of, a death
2. (Judaism) say Kaddish to be a mourner
[C17: from Aramaic qaddīsh holy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

kad•dish

(ˈkɑ dɪʃ)

n., pl. kad•di•shim (kɑˈdɪʃ ɪm)
Judaism. (often cap.)
1. a liturgical prayer glorifying God that is recited during each of the daily services.
2. a form of this prayer recited by mourners.
[1605–15; < Aramaic qaddīsh holy (one)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Kadish, Barnea, the southern border of Canaan, Moses selected leaders from the 12 tribes to make a preliminary survey of Canaan.
A decorated four-star officer, Petraeus is "one of the most prominent combat commanders in recent American military history," Lawrence Kadish, the museum's president and founder, said in a statement about the event.
Given that the committee views the Broadway Corridor as a once-in-a-generation opportunity, I was pleased to see responses from developer teams that clearly indicate they have the qualifications and proven experience to deliver on a project of this scope and scale, Nathan Kadish, chairman of the Broadway Corridor steering committee, stated in a news release.
In an announcement released today, the Association of Jewish Libraries (AJL) named Rachel Kadish the inaugural winner of its Jewish Fiction Award for her novel The Weight of Ink (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt).
Most inductees were or are outstanding one-wall small-ball players, though some were or are excellent with the big ball as well: Winfield Balance, Barbara Canton-Jackson, Charlie Danilczyk, Daskalakis, Artie Diamant, Ken Holmes, Tom Hopkins, Howie Kadish (also representing his dad, Larry, inducted as a contributor), Joe Kaplan, Stu Kirzner (also representing his dad, Irv, inducted as a player), Paul Lonergan, Ed Maisonet, Danny Maroney, Brenda Pares-Dubose, Arty Reyer, Tony Roberts, Dave Rojas, Sala, Buddy Shapiro, Bob Sparrow, Fred Sylvia, Dori Ten-Apuzzi, Dennis Uffer and Wally Ulbrich.
"We are certainly concerned in that the Trump Administration has not really taken a strong and direct stance on how they will support affordable housing stock in America, and it certainly would be nice to learn what that stance is," CAPREIT President Andrew Kadish says.
high and low grades.6-8 ONB also have a separate staging system of prognostic value, initially devised by Kadish et al.9 and modified by Delguerov et al.10 Furthermore, high grade ONB lack classic features and therefore mimic a number of other tumors of sinonasal region with different prognosis and treatment options.6
In 1962, Sanford Kadish published Criminal Law and Its Processes: Cases and Materials--a market leader now in its ninth edition.
Lastly, Kadish's paper Reaching across the divide: Considering the challenges for intercultural therapeutic dyads embedded in previously oppressive social context is a cogent piece that uses well-chosen intersubjective psychoanalytic theory to explore an excruciating therapeutic impasse due to a socio-cultural divide between a therapist and patient.
Authors represented include Edith Pearlman, Myla Goldberg, Francine Prose, Joseph Skibell, Jonathan Safran Foer, Rachel Kadish, and Scott Nadelson.