kang


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kang

(kæŋ)
n
heatable platform used for sleeping and sitting on
References in periodicals archive ?
Kang provides an integral intervention into the discussion of modern Internet activism.
According to the SEC complaint, Kang directed $2.38 billion in fixed income securities trades to Schonhorn, earning the broker often hundreds of thousands of dollars per month in commissions.
Stepping into Liberty Night and Day in Seoul, designed by Kang's firm KMGD, feels like a visit to Jay Gatsby's mansion.
In July 2015, Kang will lead the charge as vice chancellor for equity, diversity and inclusion--as unlikely a candidate as he may seem.
Jaeho Kang's book accurately reconstructs and analyses Benjamin's writings in a manner that addresses the current arguments circulating within the realm of cultural studies and media studies.
With all the pieces of the deal in place, I wish to announce that all Team Kang members are working with Xiaomi on a new and refreshed MIUI 7, which will be finally based on Android 5.1, and be coming on the Mi 5."
UN Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights Kyung-wha Kang addresses press conference (UNMISS)
Kang was most recently vice president, general counsel and secretary at Cupertino Electric, where she managed all legal and compliance functions.
Political scientist Susan Kang's book challenges that view, arguing that through what she calls a "normative negotiation process," international standards can influence state policy and produce positive outcomes for domestic labour law and policy.
Kang challenges Eurocentric assumptions such as the norms and rules surrounding the Westphalian system in which obviously states and their sovereignty are in basic regarded as equal.
The Singapore Art Museum held a retrospective by Hyung Koo Kang titled The Burning Gaze, showcasing almost 20 portraits in oil on canvas and included his collection of miniature sculptural busts worked in clay.
In this work Kang seeks to address one central puzzle: that for nearly five centuries (1368-1841) the four major states of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam) engaged in interstate war on just two occasions.