Captain lieutenant

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Related to Kapitanleutnant: kaleidoscope, Military ranks
a lieutenant with the rank and duties of captain but with a lieutenant's pay, - as in the first company of an English regiment.

See also: Captain

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
The German crew, including Kapitanleutnant Hans Heidtmann, was taken on board under guard.
The submarine rose into the dazzling glare of Petard's searchlights and the German crew, including Kapitanleutnant Hans Heidtmann, was taken on board under guard.
Galpin reported that, "As we began to turn I thought I saw a slight glow inside the envelope and 15 seconds later, when she came in sight on our other side, she was hanging tail down at an angle of 45 degrees with the lower half of her envelope thoroughly alight." L.22, veteran of 81 flights and 11 raids, was the first Zeppelin destroyed in 1917, taking Kapitanleutnant Ulrich Lehmann and 20 crewmen with it.
Kapitanleutnant Gustav Siess was in command of the U-73 from the day it was commissioned on October 9, 1915, until May 21, 1917.
Its commander Kapitanleutnant Alois Bocker was not only one of Germany's most experienced Zeppelin captains but was familiar with the area, having visited the port of Leith while serving in the merchant navy before the war.
The ship departed from Liverpool for Canada on September 13, 1940, and on September 17, she was sighted by U-48, commanded by Kapitanleutnant Heinrich Bleichrodt, who fired three torpedoes.
The plights of individual passengers are charted, as are the actions of Kapitanleutnant Walter Schwieger, commander of German submarine U-20, who gave the order to fire a torpedo at the ship, shortly before it reached the Irish coast, resulting in the loss of almost 1,200 lives.
The plights of individual passengers from third, second and first class are charted, as are the actions of Kapitanleutnant Walter Schwieger, the commander of German submarine U-20, who gave the order to fire a torpedo at the ship shortly before it reached the Irish coast, resulting in the loss of almost 1,200 lives.
A torpedo fired by German submarine U9 commanded by Kapitanleutnant Otto Weddigen had broken the ship's hull.
In the second half of the month of June, 1942, a German U-boat U-701, piloted by Kapitanleutnant Horst Degen, blew up oil tankers and sunk pursuing US warships at Virginia Beach.
Adherence to the fundamentals paid off over time, reflected by the experience of Kapitanleutnant Werner Hartenstein.
John's harbour is called "The Narrows" for a reason, so perhaps Kapitanleutnant Ulrich Borcherdt in U-58 7 was attempting to seal it or possibly test the harbour defences, but his motives will never be known as the U-boat was lost with all hands a few weeks later (27 March).