Kapitsa


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Related to Kapitsa: Kapitza resistance

Ka•pi•tsa

or Ka•pi•tza

(ˈkɑp yɪt sə)

n.
Pyotr L(eonidovich), 1894–1984, Russian physicist.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first paragraph of text under Immunization Activities on page 833 beginning with the third sentence originally read "Administrative OPV3 coverage (calculated by dividing the number of doses administered by the estimated target population) in 2017 ranged from 100% in the central provinces of Kapitsa and Panjsher to 24% and 9% in the southern provinces of Helmand and Kabul, respectively.
We chose the GEM index specifically because it is a measurement of agency (Kapitsa 2008).
As far as I know, Pavlov never wrote to Stalin (general secretary of the Communist Party), which distinguishes him from other Russian scientists such as Vladimir Vernadskii, Petr Kapitsa, or Nikolai Kol'tsov.
mokslininkai Kapitsa ir Wall savo eksperimentuose sugeneravo 10 T impulsinius magnetinius laukus laukui generuoti naudodami nesudetingos konstrukcijos vyniojamuosius induktorius, kurie net nebuvo ausinami (3 pav.).
Once we been told rightly by one of the then Soviet Ambassador in Pakistan, Mikhail Kapitsa, that, "We support India and Afghanistan against you because they are our friends, even when they are in the wrong.
Their lives were not all equally exciting, but some were fascinating: There was Yakov Zeldovich, the main theoretical physicist of the Soviet atomic bomb project; Yurii Khariton, the man in charge for forty-six years of the nuclear weapons laboratory at Arzamas-16; the "autocratic" Petr Kapitsa, who founded an institute and wrote letters to Stalin denouncing his colleagues; and Lev Landau, the weapons developer admired by Edward Teller.
Kapitsa, also a Nobel laureate, publicly declared that Lysenko's work was a fraud.
Once told rightly by one of the Soviet Ambassadors in Pakistan, Mikhail Kapitsa, "We support India and Afghanistan against you because they are our friends, even when they are wrong.
Russian geographer Andrei Kapitsa noted the likely location of the lake and named it following Soviet Antarctic missions in the 1950s and 1960s, but it wasn't until 1994 that its existence was proven by Russian and British scientists.