Karaism


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karaism

(ˈkɛərəˌɪzəm)
n
(Judaism) the beliefs and doctrines of the Karaite sect

Karaism

a Jewish theology based on literal interpretation of the Old Testament and rejection of rabbinical commentary. — Karaite, n.
See also: Judaism
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In its pre-dogmatic stage, it was stimulated by the renaissance of Greek learning, Moslem theology (establishing the legal status of Jews as dhimmis, a protected minority), and Karaism. Jewish thinkers like Saadia, Bahya, and Judah Halevi began to think of faith in terms of philosophic propositions.
Reimmann and the transformation of Jewish philosophy, the ground floor of Judaism: scepticism and certainty in Moses Mendelssohn's Jerusalem, and whether Karaites are sceptics: the Jewish perception of Karaism in 19th-century Italy.
Hillel Halkin is going in the right direction when he writes, "'Karaism' for Ozick is less a chapter in Jewish history than a metaphor for the rejection of history--for the contention that the highest human experience is the pristine encounter with an uninterpreted reality, with the original self' and the 'here and now'" (Hillel Halkin, "What Is Cynthia Ozick About?" Commentary, Vol.
They analyze his career and his path to the extreme, explore the politics of religion in his thought, describe his years in Schwerin as an ecclesiastical councilor, and examine his attitude toward Karaism. They describe his place in the debates about circumcision, the prayer book, the liturgy, and the legal character of Jewish marriage, and compare his work to that of Frankel, Zunz, Stern, Hirsch, and Einhorn.
Of the fifteen studies--most of which are quite good--four concern poetry, three grammar, two liturgy, one lexicography, one biblical exegesis, one polemics, one Karaism, one Byzantine Hebrew writing, and one the ars memorativa.
Students of Karaism and students of medieval Byzantium present a partial Hebrew edition and English translation of Judah Hadassi's Eshkol ha-kofer (Cluster of Henna Blossoms), a summa of theology, law, exegesis, polemic, linguistics, and other matters.
Nevertheless, I have studied Karaism and am one of those who, the author says, "have written extensively on both medieval Karaite commentaries and Karaism's unique halakhic, legal, philosophical, and historical position" (p.
Akhiezer explores Eastern European Karaite historical thought, focusing on the social functions of the major Karaite historical narratives concerning theories of Karaism and its relationship with rabbinic Judaism.
But when the center of Karaism shifted to the Byzantine-Turkish world during the 12th through 16th centuries, Karaites relied on rabbinic literature to compile historical data for their own readings of Jewish history.
Karaism is a Jewish religious movement of a scripturalist and messianic nature, which emerged in the Middle Ages in the areas of Persia-Iraq and Palestine and which has maintained its unique and varied forms of identity and existence until the present day, undergoing resurgent cycles of creativity, within its major geographical centres of the Middle East, Byzantium-Turkey, the Crimea, and Eastern Europe.
Language and Textuality in Byzantine Karaism: Grammatical Concepts, Biblical Text Traditions, and Hermeneutic Aspects in the Constantinople Center (Late 11th - First Half of 14th Centuries)
Bibliographia Karaitica: An Annotated Bibliography of Karaites and Karaism. Vol 2: Karaite Texts and Studies, by Barry Dov Walfish and Mikhail Kizilov.