Karuk


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Related to Karuk: Yurok

Ka·ruk

 (kə-rŭk′)
n.
Variant of Karok.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
TOBACCO AMONG THE KARUK INDIANS OF CALIFORNIA 1, 5-6 (1932) (discussing
adverse modification of habitat of such species." (163) In Karuk Tribe of California v U.S.
"You can have enough toxin in a shellfish that it's a health concern," Otten said, adding that the Yurok and Karuk tribes harvest the mussels downriver.
Karuk Tribe Housing Authority, (160) the Ninth Circuit held that the Age Discrimination in Employment Act did not apply to an individual's employment relationship with the Karuk Tribe Housing Authority because it touched upon purely internal matters related to the tribe's self-governance.
(83.) See John Bowman, Karuk Study Results Released, SISKIYOUDAILY.COM (July 1, 2012, 10:33 AM), http://www.siskiyoudaily.eom/article/20120604/NEWS/306049993/0/SEARCH (updating description of Karuk Tribe Report on the Scott River controversy).
The stories of the Native American Karuk tribe and black and Asian-American farmers highlight the role of land in cultural, economic and social health, the structural constraints on livelihoods that can be overtly or indirectly racialised in effect and the privileging of European-American relations with the land, food,family and labour.
Abundance, distribution, and diversity of freshwater mussels in two Northern California rivers within Karuk Ancestral Territory.
Hopkins Creek, and Klamath River, which the local Yurok, Karuk, and Hoopa tribes use fur sustenance fishing.
Googling a runner Yurok 4.15 Aintree The Yurok, whose name means "downriver people" in the neighbouring Karuk language, are Native Americans who live in north-western California near the Klamath River and Pacific coast.
Herbalist Peters, with much help from collaborators and informants, explains how various plants are used for medicine and food by the Karuk people along northern California's Trinity River.