plication

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pli·ca·tion

 (plī-kā′shən) also plic·a·ture (plĭk′ə-cho͝or′)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of folding.
b. The state of being folded.
2. A fold.

plication

(plaɪˈkeɪʃən) or

plicature

n
1. (Biology) the act of folding or the condition of being folded or plicate
2. (Geological Science) a folded part or structure, esp a fold in a series of rock strata
3. (Surgery) surgery the act or process of suturing together the walls of a hollow organ or part to reduce its size

pli•ca•tion

(plaɪˈkeɪ ʃən, plɪ-)

n.
1. the act or procedure of folding.
2. a fold.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin plicātiō. See plicate, -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plication - an angular or rounded shape made by foldingplication - an angular or rounded shape made by folding; "a fold in the napkin"; "a crease in his trousers"; "a plication on her blouse"; "a flexure of the colon"; "a bend of his elbow"
pleat, plait - any of various types of fold formed by doubling fabric back upon itself and then pressing or stitching into shape
angular shape, angularity - a shape having one or more sharp angles
twirl, kink, twist - a sharp bend in a line produced when a line having a loop is pulled tight
pucker, ruck - an irregular fold in an otherwise even surface (as in cloth)
2.plication - the act of folding in parallel folds
folding, fold - the act of folding; "he gave the napkins a double fold"

plication

noun
A line or an arrangement made by the doubling of one part over another:
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, significant decreases in "less effective" procedures such as Kelly plication and needle suspensions were observed, with rates dropping below 2% for each in 2006.
Development of postoperative urinary stress incontinence in clinically continent patients undergoing prophylactic Kelly plication during genitourinary prolapse repair.
Buttressing of the bladder neck with a Kelly plication stitch was originally described by Howard Kelly in 1913.