Celts

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Celts

A people dominating western and central Europe from the Bronze Age to the middle of the first century BC.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the book Egypt,Greece and Rome, author Charles Freeman writes that it is difficult to describe one tribe as Celts or Keltoi as the Greeks called them.
The association proved a successful one with the pair landing several wins including with Keltoi in the Listed Jebel Ali Stakes.
Kim McCone, quoted by Dr Howell, actually emphasised that "Keltoi" was only one name the speakers of the Ancient Celtic languages used, it was not the only one.
TOMSlemen''s excellent story about the Keltoi - what we call Leprechauns and such - transported me back to the summer of 1964 when the Beatles returned to the city on July 10 for the premiere of their first film A Hard Day's Night.
Dam dual Gr1-winning sprinter, half-sister to Listed winner Keltoi and Gr2-placed winner Volksraad (also leading sire in New Zealand).
He is also the lead singer for Keltoi, a Celtic band based in Seattle.
There is, on the other hand, clear evidence that many of our commonly held beliefs about their origins derive from a 2,500-year-old mistake by Herodotus, who, in a passing remark about the 'Keltoi', located them at the source of the Danube, which he thought was near the Pyrenees.
'Celts' means exactly the same thing - 'Keltoi' in Greek.
Generally, the ancient sources are mutually contradictory, especially in their varying use of the terms Keltoi, Galatae, or Galli; therefore, these terms cannot be used as the basis for modern archaeological nomenclature.8 The Celts subsequently vanished from the historical record as an ethnic group in the fifth century.
Only classical sources, with their reasoned and accessible intelligence, could therefore establish the British experience in ways fully cogent and persuasive.(43) In the shadow of these perceptions, doubtless, also lay classical antiquity's prejudice against any vernacular, whether of the Angles or of the Keltoi. In the end much of Buchanan's undertaking seems to have become self-subverted, and strikingly so with his well-known comment: