Kelvin

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Kelvin

, First Baron Title of William Thomson. 1824-1907.
British physicist who developed the Kelvin scale of temperature (1848) and supervised the laying of a trans-Atlantic cable (1866).

kel·vin

 (kĕl′vĭn)
n. pl. kelvin Abbr. K
1. A unit of absolute temperature equal to 1/273.16 of the absolute temperature of the triple point of water. One kelvin degree is equal to one Celsius degree. See Table at measurement.
2. Kelvin A temperature scale in which zero occurs at absolute zero and each degree equals one kelvin. Water freezes at 273.15 K and boils at 373.15 K.

[After First Baron Kelvin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Kelvin

(ˈkɛlvɪn)
n
(Biography) William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin. 1824–1907, British physicist, noted for his work in thermodynamics, inventing the Kelvin scale, and in electricity, pioneering undersea telegraphy

kelvin

(ˈkɛlvɪn)
n
(Units) the basic SI unit of thermodynamic temperature; the fraction of the thermodynamic temperature of the triple point of water. Symbol: K
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Kel•vin

(ˈkɛl vɪn)

n.
1. William Thomson, 1st Baron, 1824–1907, English physicist and mathematician.
2. (l.c.) the base SI unit of temperature, defined to be 1/273.16 of the triple point of water. Symbol: K
adj.
3. of or pertaining to an absolute scale of temperature (Kel′vin scale`) based on the kelvin in which the degree intervals are equal to those of the Celsius scale.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

kel·vin

(kĕl′vĭn)
A unit of absolute temperature having the same value as one Celsius degree. It is used in the Kelvin scale. See more at Celsius. See Table at measurement.

Kelvin

, First Baron. Title of William Thomson 1824-1907.
British mathematician and physicist known especially for his work on heat and electricity. In 1848 he proposed a scale of temperature independent of any physical substance, which became known as the Kelvin scale.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

kelvin

(K) A scale of temperature measurement in which each degree is equal to 1⁄273.16 of the interval between 0 K (absolute zero) and the triple point of water. K = °C + 273.16. Named after William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824–1907).
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kelvin - the basic unit of thermodynamic temperature adopted under the Systeme International d'Unites
temperature unit - a unit of measurement for temperature
2.kelvin - British physicist who invented the Kelvin scale of temperature and pioneered undersea telegraphy (1824-1907)Kelvin - British physicist who invented the Kelvin scale of temperature and pioneered undersea telegraphy (1824-1907)
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Translations
References in classic literature ?
He brought from London a Kelvin sounding apparatus, with a sufficient length of piano-wire for testing any probable depth.
Then came Sir William Thomson, latterly known as Lord Kelvin. It was fitting that he should be there, for he was the foremost elec- trical scientist at that time in the world, and had been the engineer of the first Atlantic Cable.
New magnetic measurements, detailed by German physicists online June 26 at arXiv.org, indicate that pressurized hydrogen sulfide is a superconductor at roughly 200 kelvins.
Hinode's X-ray telescope can record emissions that range between about 1 million and 4 million kelvins (273.15 kelvins equals 0[degrees]C or 32[degrees]F).
Allow me to reiterate my delight that you allowed kelvins to be used at all.
Their analyses revealed a crystal called olivine, which forms at temperatures between 900 and 1,100 kelvins (1,160[degrees]F to 1,520[degrees]F).
In 2000, the researchers detected the molecule in a region of the star-forming cloud Sagittarius B2 that has a temperature of about 50 kelvins. In the Sept.
Taken by the Cassini spacecraft on July 1, the false-color image shows the unlit surface of the rings, where temperatures vary from 70 kelvins (blue) to 110 kelvins (red).
328) states that star BAT99-2 "is the hottest Wolf-Rayet star known, with a surface temperature of 120,000 kelvins...." BAT99-2's temperature is actually less than 100,000 kelvins, and the star is the hottes Wolf-Rayet star know in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy.
But it takes an even hotter, more massive star, with a surface temperature greater than 75,000 kelvins and a mass heavier than 20 times that of the sun, to strip helium atoms of their two electrons.
Elliot of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the temperature of Pluto's upper atmosphere--the region beginning about 30 kilometers above the planet's surface--has declined by 5 to 15 kelvins, down to about 85 kelvins, over the past 14 years.
Now, Hyoung Joon Choi and his colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley (Calif.) National Laboratory explain the superconductor's exceptionally high transition temperature of 39 kelvins, as well as other puzzling properties of the material.