Kerr effect


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Kerr effect: Faraday effect, Pockels effect

Kerr effect

n
1. (General Physics) Also called: electro-optical effect the production of double refraction in certain transparent substances by the application of a strong electric field
2. (General Physics) Also called: magneto-optical effect a slight elliptical polarization of plane polarized light when reflected from one of the poles of a strong magnet
[C19: named after John Kerr (1824–1907), Scottish physicist]
References in periodicals archive ?
There was without doubt a 'Stephen Kerr effect' in Stirling.
Two modalities were exhibited: the first when the pump beam induced a Kerr effect in the MWCNTs-[Pt.sub.5] sample and the second when the pump beam excited the MWCNTs-[Pt.sub.30] film.
In practice, FWM and THG effects require phase-matching conditions that are typically of great difficulty to achieve in optical fibers [18]; therefore, Kerr effect is typically included through the refractive index dependence on the electric field intensity, which is related with the SPM.
The optical Kerr effect can be derived from different physical mechanisms of nonlinear refractive index.
The resonant wavelength of PhCRR depends on the refractive index of the rod material, radius (a) and dimensions of the core structure of resonant ring [16].The input power of optical waves induces the nonlinear effects in dielectric materials such as Kerr effect [17].
"Our approach conditions the information before it is even sent, so the receiver is free of crosstalk caused by the Kerr effect."
The same phenomenon takes place also due to the incoming field itself, in which case one speaks about the AC, or optical, Kerr effect [2,3].
All-optical ultrafast photonic switches based on the nonlinear Kerr effect in an optical waveguide draw particular attention toward high-bit-rate optical communication systems and ultrafast information processing [13].
Each term of the equation sequentially represents a linear attenuation, a dispersion of the first, the second and the third place value, the Kerr effect, the stimulated Raman scattering and a change of the pulse slope [1].As we can see from the Schrodinger equation, the optical signal is changed by these effects classified as:
External EM fields affect light transmission in the optical fiber through electro-optic Kerr effect and Faraday effect.