Kerr effect


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Related to Kerr effect: Faraday effect, Pockels effect

Kerr effect

n
1. (General Physics) Also called: electro-optical effect the production of double refraction in certain transparent substances by the application of a strong electric field
2. (General Physics) Also called: magneto-optical effect a slight elliptical polarization of plane polarized light when reflected from one of the poles of a strong magnet
[C19: named after John Kerr (1824–1907), Scottish physicist]
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Supply of kerr effect setup for pg physics laboratory
The input power of optical waves induces the nonlinear effects in dielectric materials such as Kerr effect [17].
Our approach conditions the information before it is even sent, so the receiver is free of crosstalk caused by the Kerr effect.
The same phenomenon takes place also due to the incoming field itself, in which case one speaks about the AC, or optical, Kerr effect [2,3].
All-optical ultrafast photonic switches based on the nonlinear Kerr effect in an optical waveguide draw particular attention toward high-bit-rate optical communication systems and ultrafast information processing [13].
Each term of the equation sequentially represents a linear attenuation, a dispersion of the first, the second and the third place value, the Kerr effect, the stimulated Raman scattering and a change of the pulse slope [1].
External EM fields affect light transmission in the optical fiber through electro-optic Kerr effect and Faraday effect.
In addition to FWM, self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation (XPM) arise from the Kerr effect.
The chapters discuss negative refraction, negative refractive index and subwavelength imaging, magneto-optics and the Kerr effect with ferromagnetic materials, symmetry properties of nonlinear magneto-optical effects, optical magnetism in plasmonic metamaterials, chiral photonic media, optical vortices, photonic crystals, wave interference and modes in random media, chaotic behaviors of random lasers, lasing in random media, feedback in random lasers, optical metamaterials with zero loss and plasmonic nanolasers, resonance energy transfer, optics of nanostructured materials from first principles, organic photonic materials, charge transport and optical effects in disordered organic semiconductors, holography and its applications, and slow and fast light.
Furthermore, the subpicosecond time-resolved optical Kerr effect (OKE) was used to measure the third-order optical nonlinearity.
Reading this data depends upon a property called the Kerr effect - the ability of a magnetic field to rotate light.