Kiaochow


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Kiaochow

(ˈkjaʊˈtʃaʊ)
n
(Placename) a variant transliteration of the Chinese name for Jiaozhou
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References in periodicals archive ?
Memorandum: The Claim of China for Direct Restitution to Herself of the Leased Territory of Kiaochow, the Tsingtao-Chinan Railway and Other German Rights in Respect of the Shantung Province.
In December 1937, a Chinese resident living off Kiaochow road reported the presence of corpses of children on the ground.
The adjective "temporary" reminded TR that in 1898 Kaiser Wilhelm II had "temporarily" acquired Kiaochow in China, on a lease that His Majesty had somehow lengthened to ninety-nine years.
In widely-publicized speeches at the embarkation of the German contingents of the international China relief force, he demanded "unceasing exemplary retribution and vengeance," famously instructing his soldiers "that no quarter will be given and no prisoners will be made." (85) In light of such talk Salisbury and Francis Bertie, the chief clerk with far eastern responsibility, suspected the Kaiser of having "big designs in China" to add to the exisiting naval base at Kiaochow. The "warlike spirit" of the Emperor's speeches served Salisbury as a convenient pretext initially to refuse placing British troops in China under a German supreme commander, though ultimately he was forced to yield.
However, the presence in China of Russians, Japanese, and Germans (who forced China to relinquish Kiaochow Bay, a prime coaling station, in March 1898) placed these hopes in peril.
The murder of German missionaries in Shantung (Shandong) provided a pretext for Germany to demand territorial compensation in the form of a leased territory at Kiaochow Bay, an acquisition that triggered vigorous competition by Russia, Britain, France, and Japan.
Since the German navy, by way of compensation for the missionary murder, took possession of Kiaochow [8] on the promontory in the east of the very same province of Shandong, it is often assumed that the emergence in 1898 of the Boxer movement in that province was a direct response to the aggressive intervention of the missionaries and their increasingly assertive converts, as well as to the perceived close link between the foreign missionary enterprise and an ever more threatening Wester n secular imperialism.
The Qingdao Soda Plant on Kiaochow Bay, for example, has dramatically altered the condition of sediments.
It was tried in Canada's western provinces, in New Zealand (from 1840, when George was a baby), Australia, Taiwan, and German-held Kiaochow (mainly Tsingtao city), in all cases with booming success.