Zedekiah

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Related to King Zedekiah: nebuchadnezzar, Babylon, King Cyrus

Zed·e·ki·ah

 (zĕd′ĭ-kī′ə) Sixth century bc.
The last king of Judah (597-586 bc). He revolted unsuccessfully (588-586) against Nebuchadnezzar II and was sent to captivity in Babylon, where he died.

Zedekiah

(ˌzɛdəˈkaɪə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament the last king of Judah, who died in captivity at Babylon. Douay spelling: Sedecias
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Jewish tradition teaches that King Zedekiah sought to escape through it during the destruction of the First Jewish Temple in 586 BCE by the occupying Babylonian army.
King Zedekiah is slaughtered after witnessing horrible violence.
In a surge of national repentance, the people made a covenant with King Zedekiah to proclaim liberty, freeing every slave from servitude.
In Jeremiah 28 he appears in a central location, the Jerusalem temple, in the company of the priests and "all the people." Read in the context of Jeremiah 27, however, it is reasonable to conclude that the narrator intends for the reader to see in Hananiah a particular example of those prophets, soothsayers, and diviners against whom Jeremiah rails in chapter 27 These are all central intermediaries, providing counsel to the kings of the surrounding nations (27:3-11), King Zedekiah of Judah (27:12-15), and to the priests of the Jerusalem sanctuary (27:16-17).
Jeremiah exhorts Judah's king Zedekiah to surrender to the Babylonians because that is the will of God: "Put your necks under the yoke of the king of Babylon and serve him and his people, and live!" (Jeremiah 27: 12).
Juliana of Rawdon gave us an uplifting homily on the Scripture readings of the Mass for August 19: Jeremiah cast into the deep pit and left to die by the son of King Zedekiah and St.
If King Zedekiah had sent soldiers to participate in Psammetichus II's campaign against Kush in 593, a shift in his alliance with Egypt would have had to precede the campaign and therefore also the anti-Babylonian conference in Judah.
As much as King Zedekiah tried to manage the nation's crisis in conventional ways, he could not hold the nation together and could not manipulate his foreign policy to save his skin.