Kishinev


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Ki·shi·nev

 (kĭsh′ə-nĕf′, -nôf′, kyĭ′shĭ-nyôf′)

Kishinev

(Russian kiʃiˈnjɔf)
n
(Placename) the Russian name for Chişinǎu

Ki•shi•nev

(ˈkɪʃ əˌnɛf, -ˌnɔf, -ˌnɒf)

n.
the Russian name of Chişinău.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Kishinev - the capital of Moldova
Moldavia, Moldova, Republic of Moldova - a landlocked republic in eastern Europe; formerly a European soviet but achieved independence in 1991
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
While the "great" events in the history of anti-Semitismthe massacre in York in 1190, the Spanish expulsion of 1492, the Kishinev pogrom in 1903 and, above all, the Holocaustloom large in the Jewish imagination, it is the persistence of "casual," everyday anti-Semitism that reveals its deeper roots.
The origins of the twentieth-century pogrom narrative are usually attributed to Chaim Nachman Bialik's gut-wrenching Hebrew-language poem, "In the City of Slaughter," written in the immediate aftermath of the 1903 Kishinev pogrom.
The top five of the most romantic cities of the cities of the CIS, popular for tourist trips on weekends, include the capital cities of Astana in Kazakhstan, Baku in Azerbaijan, Minsk in Belarus, Kishinev in Moldova and Tbilisi in Georgia.
One dates to 1824 and is found among other notes known under the collective heading "Tales from Arina Rodionovna"; the second is in his Kishinev notebook of 1822 (Lenin Library, no.
Amid the revolutionary crisis of 1905 and due to the new avenues opened for public activity, a group of conservative Romanian-speaking landowners and officials founded the Moldavian Society for the Spread of National Culture in September 1905Under the leadership of Pavel Dicescul, a prominent local activist and a marshal of nobility for Kishinev District, this organization championed the rather moderate agenda of cultural enlightenment aimed at the Romanian-speaking peasantry, while emphasizing its loyalty to the dynasty and the imperial order.
class="MsoNormalAnyway, see if you can read our beloved Marjorie Macgoye's novel, A Farm Called Kishinev. It is a scintillating narrative of a Jewish "pioneer" family in Uasin Gishu, where a Jewish homeland was once supposed to be established.
Synopsis: Born in 1946 in Tula, Russia, grew up in Kishinev, Moldavia, in the former USSR, Eliezer A.
His home until he decided to join the occupation of Palestine in 1978, was Kishinev, where, in 1903, a pogrom sent Jews fleeing westward.
"We perceive this initiative as a blatant propaganda move of some of the political figures in Kishinev, who seek to score political points ahead of the upcoming parliamentary elections by fueling anti-Russian sentiments," the Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement.
Vladislav Kulminsky, the deputy director of Kishinev's Institute of Strategic Initiatives, warns that the Democratic Party is quietly sanctioning the movement.