klebsiella

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kleb·si·el·la

 (klĕb′zē-ĕl′ə)
n.
A nonmotile, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. pneumoniae, that causes pneumonia and other infections usually in patients with diminished immunity, such as diabetics and alcoholics.

[New Latin, genus name, after Edwin Klebs (1834-1913), German-American pathologist born in Königsberg (Kaliningrad).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

klebsiella

(ˌklɛbzɪˈɛlə)
n
(Microbiology) a Gram-negative bacteria found in the respiratory, intestinal, and urinogenital tracts of humans and animals, which can cause pneumonia and urinary infections
[C20: after Edwin Klebs (1834–913), German bacteriologist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.klebsiella - a genus of nonmotile rod-shaped Gram-negative enterobacteria; some cause respiratory and other infections
enteric bacteria, enterics, enterobacteria, entric - rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria; most occur normally or pathogenically in intestines of humans and other animals
genus Klebsiella - a genus of bacteria
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
klebsiela

klebsiella

n. klebsiela, bacilo gram-negativo asociado con infecciones respiratorias y del tracto urinario.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Klebsiella rhinoscleromatis was the most common causative organism, while Klebsiella ozaenae and Klebsiella pneumoniae were reported rarely.
Kennedy, "Subphrenic abscess secondary to Actinomycosis meyeri and Klebsiella ozaenae following laparoscopic cholecystectomy," Southern Medical Journal, vol.
It was observed prevalence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella ozaenae, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli.
The first plasmid encoded ESBLs was discovered in isolates of Klebsiella ozaenae in Germany in 1983.6 The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute suggests screening of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca and Proteus mirabilis for potential ESBLs producers.