Koheleth


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Related to Koheleth: Ecclesiastes

Koheleth

(kəʊˈhɛlɪθ)
n
(Bible) Old Testament Ecclesiastes or its author, traditionally believed to be Solomon
[from Hebrew qōheleth]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(76.) Gordis, Koheleth, 129, even describes joy in Ecclesiastes as "God's categorical imperative for man." The God of Qoheleth and the Allah of Mohammed are not at all closely related, contra Paterson, The Book That Is Alive, 145.
(65) Life and death circle one another in an endless cycle as Steven Peck and the wise Preacher (Koheleth) in Ecclesiastes both claim.
He substitutes Ruth for Esther, which would at least be logical since they are both biblical female protagonists, but also inexplicably Koheleth. All three are part of the so-called Hamesh Megitot--five scrolls--read during synagogue Services on various Jewish holidays and thus forming the basis of the annual cycle of observance, with Ruth read on Shavuot, Esther--on Purim, and Ecclesiastes--on Sukkot.
Thus, the logic of the theory meant that, even though traditionally Qoheleth/Ecclesiastes has been associated with King Solomon, and hence a very early date, even a very conservative Christian scholar like Franz Delitzsch had to concede in 1877 that such a date was impossible, with the famous statement: "If the Book of Koheleth were of old Solomonic origin, then there is no history of the Hebrew language" (Delitzsch 1877:190).
The models for King Lear, Bloom notes are Solomon - in advanced old age, Koheleth (Ecclesiastes) and the Apocrypha's Wisdom of Solomon which the compilers of the Bible changed but only slightly.
Entertaining: Hamstead's John Conway puts in a strong tackle on Jordelle Donaldson and (inset) Matt Gibson in mid-air action with Aston Social's Koheleth Bailey.
Hebrew Printing in America 1735-1926, the most extensive catalogue of its field yet attempted, is essentially a highly revised and expanded, English-language version of a landmark work published in Hebrew in 1926 (whence the seemingly arbitrary terminus ad quem), the Koheleth Amerika of Ephraim Deinard.
These biblical precepts are not limiting but promote comparisons between Koheleth (Ecclesiastes) and Buddha, among others.
(28) Tennyson verges on the same thought in the opening lines of "Tithonus": "Man comes and tills the field and lies beneath, / And after many a summer dies the swan." In the famous verses from the opening chapter of Ecclesiastes, Koheleth expressed the same idea, but without fully articulating it philosophically: "One generation passeth away, and another generation cometh: but the earth abideth for ever" (1.4).
They would also benefit from keeping in mind Koheleth's wisdom: "Whatever has been is what will be, and whatever has been done is what will be done.
In Mark Twain's theology, he is the truth-seeker momentarily banished from heaven, the preacher Koheleth. (25) He thus usurps certain functions of Christ, the consoler ...
Of all the books in the TaNaCH, or Hebrew Bible, it has been suggested that Koheleth (Eng., Ecclesiastes) has the hardest-to-penetrate meaning, For the casual reader much of the TaNaCH is hard to understand.