Korzybski


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Korzybski

(kɔːˈzɪbskɪ)
n
(Biography) Alfred (Habdank Skarbek). 1879–1950, US originator of the theory and study of general semantics, born in Poland
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Korzybski - United States semanticist (born in Poland) (1879-1950)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Alfred Korzybski's extensional theory of happiness appears in his 1937 Olivet Lectures.
Korzybski endeavoured to study and approach the evolutionary nature of human beings by propounding the time-binding theory that takes into consideration all the characteristics that make a man, man.
And Alfred Korzybski, disturbed and shaken by war, found his calling in devising a methodology to reduce misevaluation.
Hayakawa was at the helm (including the six or-so years while Korzybski himself was still alive, interested, and involved), and during which Hayakawa published a number of the most prominent public intellectuals of the 20th Century--many of whom I attempted to represent under the previous cover for that very reason.
This new edition of Korzybski's 1948 work seeks to introduce his work to a new generation of readers, particularly those enmeshed in the contemporary digital culture.
Born in Canada, Hayakawa studied with Alfred Korzybski and taught at the University of Chicago and at San Francisco State College.
In 1933, Alfred Korzybski published a book of 798 pages entitled Science and Sanity, setting forth a methodological system, both theoretical and practical, dealing with all of human life.
Those familiar with Korzybski and general semantics will recognize how appropriate these geographical metaphors are given Korzybski's famous saying, "the map is not the territory"--used to help others comprehend the difficulty of using our symbol system of language to represent and communicate meaning and experience.
Slan (1946) concerns mutant humans who can read minds, and The World of A (1948, later The World of Null-A, 1953), deals with inhabitants of Venus who are conditioned semantically by the "null-A," or non-Aristotelian, doctrines of Alfred Korzybski. Van Vogt's later novels, generally less popular, include The Battle of Forever (1971), in which the last man alive cannot bring himself to use his superhuman powers against an enemy determined to exterminate humanity.
E-Prime, abolishing all forms of the verb "to be," has its roots in the field of general semantics, as presented by Alfred Korzybski in his 1933 book, Science and Sanity.
Let's begin with a letter from Alfred Korzybski to S.I.
Alfred Korzybski maintained that training in "consciousness of abstracting" would lead people beyond the paradoxes of abstraction.