Krakau


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Krakau

(ˈkraːkau)
n
(Placename) the German name for Cracow
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Krakau - an industrial city in southern Poland on the VistulaKrakau - an industrial city in southern Poland on the Vistula
Poland, Polska, Republic of Poland - a republic in central Europe; the invasion of Poland by Germany in 1939 started World War II
References in periodicals archive ?
Jachmann-Jahn U, Cornely OA, Laufs U, Hopp HW, Meuthen I, Krakau M, et al .
While the prevalence of depression in LMICs is high, the vast majority of individuals suffering from depression are not diagnosed and do not receive any treatment (Lotfi, Flyckt, Krakau, Martensson, & Nilsson, 2010; Stein & Fazel, 2015).
Only the 1606 edition published in Vilnius--Lithuania and Poland then being one nation--survives, presently located in the Cartoriskiu Library in Krakau. (51) According to Urbanowicz (2002:300) and Krzyzanowski (1984:248; 2012), Zacharzewski published it for the first time in 1590 in Vilnius and it was reissued in 1663 in Krakau, but no proof for that exists.
Krakau, "Human ocular vasodynamic changes in light and darkness," Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol.
It is well known that brain injury increases metabolic and catabolic responses (Frankenfield & Ashcraft, 2012; Krakau, Omne-Ponten, Karlsson, & Borg, 2006).
Aus Siedlungsplatzen bei Krakau in Kleinpolen sind vielfaltige Henkel- und Knubben individueller Gestalt aufgetreten, darunter die aus Asva bekannten Doppelknubben (an Topfen).
Harald Lapp and Ingo Krakau. Translated by Guido Boerrigter and Lisa C.
On 6 November 1939, along with his brother Stanislaw and other staff of the University, he was caught in the Sonderaktion Krakau, part of the Nazi effort to eliminate Polish intellectuals.
2001, als 63-jahriger, bekam er den Ruf auf den Lehrstuhl fur Ungarische Philologie an der Jagiellonen-Universitat Krakau, den er bis zu seiner Pensionierung im Jahre 2009 ausfullte.
As noted in a publication by the Council for the Protection of Struggle and Martyrdom Sites about the extermination of the Jagiellonian University professors in Sonderaktion Krakau and about the Katyn Massacre, "What constituted a heavy blow and irretrievable loss not only to Polish society but also to the world civilization were the arrests and murders of eminent representatives of Polish science carried out by both occupying powers." (166) When analysing the attitude of the Soviet authorities to Polish officers, Zdzislaw Jordanek wrote, "the imperial objectives were a decisive factor here.