Kristeva


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Kri·ste·va

 (krĭ-stā′və), Julia Born 1941.
Bulgarian-born French linguist, psychoanalyst, and writer who applies Freudian and feminist ideas to literature in works such as Language: The Unknown and Desire in Language, both published in 1969.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Kristeva

(krɪsˈteɪvə)
n
(Biography) Julia. born 1941, French semiotician, born in Bulgaria. Her works include La Révolution du langage poétique (1974), Histoires d'amour (1983), and the autobiographical novel Les Samourais (1990)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
So though we might experience a renewed awareness of our own emotional range and emotional points of weakness-that wayward and violent passion that Kristeva talks about-we are also a re-acquainted with the world around us, in its extremity and in all its dumb materiality, as we venture forth to encounter the implacable unwieldiness of the city with our babies and bags and buggies and bottles in tow.
Kristeva says that it is obvious that childbirth involves mental and physical suffering, that motherhood implies self-denial in making oneself anonymous in order to transmit social norms.
Smith's poetic discourse will be read in the light of some basic notions/elements from Julia Kristeva's Desire in Language and Susanna Egan's Mirror Talk.
Kristeva's conception of Girard's mimetic theory is problematic in a postmodern context, considering the gender spectrum and the dissolution of the nuclear family.
Offering a feminist historiography of Hebrew prose, the study merges ideas from literary dialogue, psychoanalytic feminist critical theory, and the ideas of feminist literary theorists Julia Kristeva and Judith Butler to explore the literary strategies that the women use to counter the male-dominated, patriarchal, Oedipal tradition of Hebrew literature.
While the poem's many disconnections have their idiosyncrasies that make them unique, they all can be integrated into a unifying concept using a theoretical framework derived from the work of psychoanalyst and literary theorist Julia Kristeva. While Kristevan concepts have been applied effectively to Warren's poetry in regard to his representation of maternal figures (Rivas 11), such an approach has yet to be applied to the ways in which Warren the poet explores identity and its creation.
While there are numerous "ways in" to analyzing Mama, the ideas of Julia Kristeva, specifically her comments on matricide and the symbolic order (6) are especially useful to our understanding of how Mama envelopes multiple characters in a drama of complex family and psychological dynamics, as well as the varying degrees of success the characters have in navigating traumatic experiences.
Traveling to Spain, Leclercq, Kristeva's probing alter ego, visits the sites and embodiments of the famous mystic and awakens to her own desire for faith, connection, and rebellion.