infrared astronomy

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Related to Kuiper Airborne Observatory: Kepler telescope

infrared astronomy

n.
The branch of astronomy that uses observations of emissions in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum to study extraterrestrial sources such as stars, planets, galaxies, and interstellar gas and dust clouds.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

infrared astronomy

n
(Astronomy) the study of radiations from space in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Caption: Beloved objects in the author's life, clockwise from above: Saturn taken by Voyager 2 in 1981; Halley's Comet shot by the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in 1986; a starscape featuring Cygnus; and the 2017 total solar eclipse.
Engineers also saved money by basing SOFIA's design on that of its predecessor, the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO).
Many studies have relied on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, an infrared telescope that flew high in the atmosphere in a converted C-141 airplane.
Senior editor Kelly Beatty made his first flight on SOFIA'S predecessor, NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory, in 1988.
In August, Gordon Bjoraker of NASA's Goddard Space Hight Center in Greenbelt, Md., reported that he and his colleagues, using data from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, had detected emissions from water vapor just after the fireballs from the G and K impacts became visible.
Kelly Beatty), watched from NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory."
Using an infrared spectrometer aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory Gordon Bjoraker of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and his colleagues identified emissions from water vapor immediately after the fireballs from the G and K impacts became visible.