pranayama

(redirected from Kumbhaka)
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pranayama

(ˌprɑːnəˈjɑːmə)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) (in yoga) the art of breath control, practised as an aid to concentration
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pranayama

Breathing exercises that form part of yoga.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
Translations
pránajáma
pránajáma
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References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of pranayama (rachaka, puraka and kumbhaka) on bronchial asthma.
According to Madanmohan et al, (2004), retention (kumbhaka) raises the internal temperature and plays an important part in increasing the absorption of oxygen.
Lister advises to avoid kumbhaka, a particular practice of holding the breath between inhalation and exhalation, because it is contrary to breathing for singers.
(21.) Most of the early Hatha texts mention kumbhaka. The Hathaprad[i.bar]pik[a.bar] and later texts distinguish eight kinds of kumbhaka (i.e., s[u.bar]ryabhedana, ujj[a.bar]y[i.bar], s[i.bar]tk[a.bar]r[i.bar], s[i.bar]tal[i.bar], bhastrik[a.bar], bhr[a.bar]mar[i.bar], m[u.bar]rcch[a.bar], and pl[a.bar]vin[i.bar]).
Elsewhere he defines pr[a.bar]n[a.bar]y[a.bar]ma as the "union" of sun and moon (e.g., Jyotsna 1.1), and in light of the above references, it appears that the madras (such as m[u.bar]labandha, etc.) that are employed during pr[a.bar]n[a.bar]y[a.bar]ma (e.g., Hathaprad[i.bar]pik[a.bar] 2.45-46) may be responsible for this, rather than the practice of any particular type of kumbhaka. Of the standard eight types of kumbhaka listed in Hatha texts (e.g., Hathaprad[i.bar]pik[a.bar] 2.44), no particular one is noted for bringing about the union of two things.
An outline of the yogic body and an analysis of two advanced practices called khecari mudra and kevala kumbhaka are provided to show how this specialized path to optimum health culminates in the hathayoga notion of divine body or divya de ha.
To support this thesis I also look in some detail at two specific practices, namely, khecarT mudra and kevala kumbhaka, and show how the metaphysics of non-duality (advaita) is informed in the medieval hathayoga textual tradition (2) by an underlying preoccupation with purification, rejuvenation, and longevity.
Uddiyana Bandha is the Belly Lock, most often done during exhalation and the retention after exhalation, (bahya kumbhaka).
Sekh Canda neither mentions kumbhaka (breath control) in this passage nor uses any word that indicates "stomach." "Blinder for the eye" translates thuni, which in this sense occurs more commonly as thuli; but it is the wrong meaning for the context.
It is well established as one of the eight limbs or parts of Yoga and, as in the older Yogasutra, is divided into three stages with regular names and divine associations: inhalation (puraka) is Brahma, retention of breath (kumbhaka) is Visnu, and exhalation (recaka) is Rudra (Siva).