Ramayana

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Ra·ma·ya·na

 (rə-mä′yə-nə)
n.
A Sanskrit epic, traditionally attributed to Valmiki, that concerns the banishment of Rama from his kingdom, the abduction of his wife Sita by a demon and her rescue, and Rama's eventual restoration to the throne.

[Sanskrit Rāmāyaṇam, the going of Rama : Rāmaḥ, Rama + ayanam, a going, way (from eti, ay-, he goes; see ei- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ramayana

(rɑːˈmaɪənə)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religious Writings) a Sanskrit epic poem, composed about 300 bc, recounting the feats of Ramachandra
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ra•ma•ya•na

(rɑˈmɑ yə nə)

n.
an epic of India, concerned with the life and adventures of Ramachandra and his wife Sita.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ramayana - one of two classical Hindu epics telling of the banishment of Rama from his kingdom and the abduction of his wife by a demon and Rama's restoration to the throneRamayana - one of two classical Hindu epics telling of the banishment of Rama from his kingdom and the abduction of his wife by a demon and Rama's restoration to the throne
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, we encounter such figures as Kumbhahanu (6.46.15, 19; 6.62.37; 924*, following notes to 6.63.29), Kumbhakarana (passim), Nikumbha (6.62.37; 6.64; 7.27.23-24), and Kumbhinasi (7.5.36 [elder]; 7.25.20, 25 [younger]).
25 -- Effigies of Ravana, Meghnada and Kumbhakarana were burnt across the Capital and other cities in North, on Wednesday at sunset as the city celebrated Dussehra - symbolising the victory of good over evil.