Kuomintang

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Kuomintang

(ˈkwəʊˈmɪnˈtæŋ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the political party founded by Sun Yat-sen in 1911 and dominant in China from 1928 until 1949 under the leadership of Chiang Kai-shek. Since then it has been the official ruling party of Taiwan
[C20: from Chinese (Mandarin): National People's Party, from kuo nation + min people + tang party]

Kuo•min•tang

(ˈkwoʊˌmɪnˈtæŋ, -ˈtɑŋ, ˈgwoʊ-)

n.
the main political party of China from 1928 to 1949, founded chiefly by Sun Yat-sen in 1911 and later led by Chiang Kai-Shek: the main party of Taiwan since 1949.
[< Chinese guómín dǎng national people's party]

Kuomintang

A Chinese political party founded in 1912, dominant from 1928 to 1949.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Kuomintang - the political party founded in 1911 by Sun Yat-sen; it governed China under Chiang Kai-shek from 1928 until 1949 when the Communists took power and subsequently was the official ruling party of Taiwan
party, political party - an organization to gain political power; "in 1992 Perot tried to organize a third party at the national level"
References in periodicals archive ?
The Reference Library of the Kuomintang of China in Taipei has recently released a classified document titled "The Summary Reports of the Propaganda Operations Conducted by the International Department of the Ministry of Information from the beginning of 1938 to April of 1941." This document lists foreign visitors to China--including Ernest Hemingway--referred to as "international friends" and expected to cooperate in spreading propaganda for the Kuomintang.
THE REFERENCE LIBRARY OF THE KUOMINTANG OF CHINA in Taipei has recently released many previously classified documents, (1) including one titled "The Summary Reports of the Propaganda Operations Conducted by the International Department of the Ministry of Information from the beginning of 1938 to April of 1941." (2) This document lists foreign visitors to China referred to as "international friends" and expected to cooperate in spreading propaganda for the Kuomintang--mainly journalists, writers, and scholars from the United States and Europe.
In this essay I will explain the document's contents, examine its value as historical material on Hemingway, and then outline what the Kuomintang of China expected of "international friends." In this Chinese context, we will reread Hemingway's references to China and reconsider his political attitude, especially compared with those of his counterparts who, at the time, were also referred to as "international friends" of the Kuomintang.