Kush

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Kush

 (kŭsh, ko͝osh)
See Cush2.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Kush

(kʌʃ; kʊʃ)
n
(Bible) a variant spelling of Cush
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Cush

or Kush

(kʊʃ, kʌʃ)

n.
1. the eldest son of Ham. Gen. 10:6.
2. an area mentioned in the Bible, sometimes identified with Upper Egypt.
3. an ancient kingdom in North Africa, in the region of Nubia.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The history of Sudan provides an exemplary and heroic role played by Sudanese queens (Kandakas) during the kingdoms of Kushite and Nepta by resisting and defeating the Roman Empire in their attempt to conquer the kingdom of Nepta.
Far less compelling and more speculative is his further brief discussion of the identity of the biblical Shishak, likely a Ramesside, and of Zerah the Kushite (2 Chron.
Kandaka Amanishaketo ruled Kushite Kingdom for ten years and repulsed invasion attempt by the Roman Empire and held a number of its soldiers captives.
More pyramids call to be explored here than in Egypt; being here, one can imagine the wealth that the Kushite Kingdoms drew to themselves and exported to eager customers living in a vast region spanning the Middle East and much of Africa.
Waziri pointed out that the canopic jars were found in a nearly cubic cutting in the floor in an intrusive burial compartment cut into the south wall of the Pillared Hall in the Kushite tomb of Karabasken (TT 391).
The area of the Nile valley known as Nubia, which lies within present-day Sudan, was home to three Kushite kingdoms during antiquity.
Highlights of her trip of a lifetime include riding a camel named Charlie Brown to Egypt's most famous landmark, the pyramids at Giza, her tour of the ancient tomb of Kushite Queen Qalhata in Sudan, filled with fascinating hieroglyphics, and undergoing a Sudanese beauty treatment that involved sitting over a charcoal fire.
Highlights of her trip of a lifetime include riding a camel named Charlie Brown to Egypt's pyramids at Giza, her tour of the ancient tomb of Kushite Queen Qalhata in Sudan, filled with fascinating hieroglyphics, and undergoing a Sudanese beauty treatment that involved sitting over a charcoal fire.
Highlights of her trip of a lifetime include riding a camel named Charlie Brown to Egypt's pyramids at Giza, her tour of the ancient tomb of Kushite Queen Qalhata, in Sudan, filled with fascinating hieroglyphics, and undergoing a Sudanese beauty treatment that involved sitting over a charcoal fire.
(This is evident with Yemini Jews who migrated to the Horn of Africa and others who continued to southern Africa and became Lemba, and no doubt with Jews along the African trade routes whose descendants may include those among the Igbo of Nigeria and Kushite Jews of the Sudan and other parts of East Africa.) Given the effects of migration, perhaps entirely different kinds of Jews could have emerged, just as Ashkenazim actually came into being in northern Christendom and became dominant during the decline of the empires in which Sephardim had influence.
But what is not so well-known is that, to manage their lives and their societies, Kemetic, Nubian and Kushite leadership relied heavily upon divine mandate delivered via altered mental states like samadhi.
The answer is simple: The Kushite kingdoms knew God and served the Almighty before Christ was born.