Kydde

Kyd´de


imp.1.imp. of Kythe, to show.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bot for the los of the, lede, is lyft up so hyghe, And thy burgh and thy burnes best ar holden, Stifest under stel-gere on stedes to ryde, The wyghtest and the worthyest of the worldes kynde, Preve for to play wyth in other pure laykes, And here is kydde cortaysye, as I ha f herd carp, And that has wayned me hider, iwyis, at this tyme (24) (258-265).
Having "herd carp" (heard tell) that Camelot features "kydde" (famous) courtesy (Tolkien, Gordon, & Davis 1967, 263), the Green Knight offers a dramatic game request that initially disgraces the Arthu-rian host by leaving it speechless, incapable of discourse: "al stouned at his steuen and stonstil seten / In a swoghe sylence" (all were astonished by his voice and remained as still as stones, completely silent) (242-43).
The confirmation that the kings have found the object of their search, that Christ may be included in the "felawship" they have established, comes with the words of I Rex, who praises God "[p]at vs has kydde pus curtaysely / To wende by many a wilsom way, / And come to pis clene companye" (11.
Wist no wy of [pe] wone bot Waynor hir seluen-- Scho hade pe kepynge hir self of pat kydde wapyn, Off cofres enclosede pat to pe crown lengede, With rynges and relikkes and pe regale of Fraunce, That was fownden on sir Froll when he was feye leuyde.' (4196-08; emphasis added)
Even though it is kept in a 'wardrop' wherein are other items attained through conquest--such as the regalia of France --Arthur's statement that Guenevere herself 'hade pe kepynge of pat kydde wapyn' further removes Clarent from the realm of the masculine and violent.
Julian for his safe delivery to Bertilak's court: "And heghly he thonkez / Jesus and sayn Gilyan, that gentyle are bothe, / That cortaysly had hym kydde, and his cry herkened" (773-75).