asparaginase

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Related to L-asparaginase: methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, vincristine

as·par·a·gin·ase

 (ə-spăr′ə-jə-nās′, -nāz′)
n.
An enzyme isolated from bacteria that catalyzes the hydrolysis of asparagine and is used in the chemotherapeutic treatment of leukemia.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

asparaginase

(əˈspærədʒɪˌneɪz; əˈspærədʒɪˌneɪs)
n
(Pharmacology) an enzyme used in treating leukaemia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asparaginase - antineoplastic drug (trade name Elspar) sometimes used to treat lymphoblastic leukemiaasparaginase - antineoplastic drug (trade name Elspar) sometimes used to treat lymphoblastic leukemia
antineoplastic, antineoplastic drug, cancer drug - any of several drugs that control or kill neoplastic cells; used in chemotherapy to kill cancer cells; all have unpleasant side effects that may include nausea and vomiting and hair loss and suppression of bone marrow function
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References in periodicals archive ?
D: L-asparaginase treated rats (1000 I.U/ Kg, i.m., daily for 5 days) showed severe vacuolation of epithelial lining pancreatic acini
L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase from Aspergillus fumigatus WL002: Production and some physicochemical properties.
Common examples of these medications include steroids, estrogens, tamoxifen, retinoic acid for acne, or L-asparaginase used in chemotherapy.
Certain disorders (multiple myeloma, diabetes mellitus, acute pancreatitis, kidney failure, or hypothyreosis) may also contribute to lipemia, as do certain drugs (such as L-asparaginase) with a fat emulsion base.
L-Asparaginase producing bacteria were isolated from soil samples under optimum conditions using submerged fermentation.
The bird showed partial response to treatment with chlorambucil, lomustine, prednisone, L-asparaginase, and whole-body radiation, with neither evidence of adverse effects nor clinical signs of disease.
After leukemia was diagnosed, chemotherapy was started (prednisone, vincristine, doxorubicin, and L-asparaginase).
Results: There were 65 infectious complications in 50 patients during vincristine, daunorubicin, L-asparaginase and dexamethasone induction therapy, including microbiologically documented infections (n = 12; 18.5%), clinically documented infections (n = 23; 35.3%) and fever of unknown origin (n = 30; 46.2%).
L-asparaginase is one such enzyme routinely employed in chemotherapy particularly for cancerous tumors of white blood cells.
L-asparaginase (L-asparagine amido hydrolase E.C.3.5.1.1) enzyme which converts L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and ammonia has been used as a chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia for over 30 years [1].
In pediatrics protocol group, the L-asparaginase dose was 8 times higher than the one used in adults protocol.