leucine

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Related to L-leucine: L-arginine

leu·cine

 (lo͞o′sēn′)
n.
An essential amino acid, C6H13NO2, obtained by the hydrolysis of protein by pancreatic enzymes during digestion and necessary for optimal growth in children and for the maintenance of nitrogen balance in adults.

[French : leuc-, leuc- + -ine, -ine.]

leucine

(ˈluːsiːn) or

leucin

n
(Biochemistry) an essential amino acid found in many proteins

leu•cine

(ˈlu sin, -sɪn)

n.
one of the essential amino acids, (CH3)2CHCH2CH(NH2)COOH, present in most proteins. Abbr.: Leu;Symbol.: L
[< French (1820) < Greek leuk(ós) white + French -ine -ine1]

leu·cine

(lo͞o′sēn′)
An essential amino acid. See more at amino acid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.leucine - a white crystalline amino acid occurring in proteins that is essential for nutrition; obtained by the hydrolysis of most dietary proteins
essential amino acid - an amino acid that is required by animals but that they cannot synthesize; must be supplied in the diet
Translations
leucin
Leucin
ロイシン
leucyna

leu·cine

n. leucina, aminoácido esencial en el crecimiento y metabolismo.

leucine

n leucina
References in periodicals archive ?
Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.
L-Leucine acts as a potential agent in reducing body temperature at hatching and affords thermotolerance in broiler chicks.
([dagger]) Essential amino acid mix (g [kg.sup.-1] diet): L-methionine, 3.20; L-lysine HC1, 11.00; L-threonine, 4.62; L-isoleucine, 5.21; L-valine, 5.85; L-arginine, 6.44; L-tryptophan, 1.25; L-histidine, 3.61; and L-leucine, 8.55 (the quality of all amino acids was above 99%; Guangzhou A'share Aquatech Co., Ltd., Guangzhou, China).
It contains readily assimilated proteins originating from milk, in addition to the branched-chain amino acid, L-Leucine.
This paper is focused on the synthesis and evaluating antimicrobial activities of secondary quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) derived from three natural amino acids (L-leucine, L-phenylalanine and L-methionine) bearing 1,3,4-oxadiazole and acetic acid moieties.
Like L-leucine itself, HMB has been shown to stimulate protein synthesis via the mTOR signal transduction pathway (2).
Still, this aerosolization enhancing property seems to be precise for an amphiphilic amino acid, that is, L-leucine, and it is not necessarily the case with other amino acids.
synthesized [SnO.sub.2] nanoparticles by a novel route of the sol-gel method assisted with biomimetic assembly using L-leucine as a biotemplate.
Gao et al., "Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous determination of l-valine, l-leucine, l-isoleucine, l-phenylalanine, and l-tyrosine in human serum," Journal of Separation Science, 2015.
44-46; [http://bit.ly/lgNALYil), the authors did not mention a medical food made from the branched-chain amino acids L-Leucine, L-Valine, and L-Isoleucine, which was reviewed by the FDA for the dietary management of tardive dyskinesia (TD) in males.(1), (2) Although this product, "Tarvil," is no longer being manufactured, compounding pharmacies can make it using the same ratio of ingredients that was tested in the clinical trial.
Ketoprofen lysine salt was kindly donated by Dompe SpA (LAquila, Italy); L-leucine was supplied by Sigma Aldrich (Milan, Italy).
The medium was based on yeast nitrogen base (YNB) without amino acids (BD Difco, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USA) and the metabolite cocktail was composed of L-arginine, L-aspartate, L-glutamate, L-histidine, L-leucine, L-lysine, L-methionine, L-serine, L-threonine, L-tryptophan, L-valine, citrate, fumarate, malate, pyruvate, succinate, cytosine, and uracil.