serine

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Related to L-serine: L-arginine, D-serine

ser·ine

 (sĕr′ēn′)
n.
An amino acid, C3H7NO3, that is a common constituent of many proteins.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

serine

(ˈsɛriːn; ˈsɪəriːn; -rɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) a sweet-tasting amino acid that is synthesized in the body and is involved in the synthesis of cysteine; 2-amino-3-hydroxypropanoic acid. Formula: CH2(OH)CH(NH2)COOH
[C19: from sericin + -ine2]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ser•ine

(ˈsɛr in, -ɪn, ˈsɪər-)

n.
a crystalline amino acid, HOCH2CH(NH2)COOH, found in many proteins and obtained by the hydrolysis of sericin. Abbr.: Ser; Symbol: S
[1875–80; < German Serin (1865); see sericin, -ine2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ser·ine

(sĕr′ēn′)
A nonessential amino acid. See more at amino acid.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.serine - a sweetish crystalline amino acid involved in the synthesis by the body of cysteine
amino acid, aminoalkanoic acid - organic compounds containing an amino group and a carboxylic acid group; "proteins are composed of various proportions of about 20 common amino acids"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Serin
seryna

serine

n serina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
M2 PRESSWIRE-August 8, 2019-: Global L-Serine Industry Analysis 2019, Market Growth, Trends, Opportunities Forecast To 2024
Structurally, phosphatidylserine is an amino acid that consists of glycerophosphate skeleton conjugated with two fatty acids and L-serine via a phosphodiester linkage.
While searching for ways to block the neurotoxin, Dr Cox and colleagues found that the commonly occurring amino acid L-serine not only blocked BMAA but was also neuro-protective.
We have found that L-serine offers neuroprotection and we believe that it can slow down the progression of disease."
Paul Cox seems to have invented something he calls L-serine, "an amino acid that serves critical functions in the central nervous system, among other things.
In our patient, oral L-serine therapy was provided at 500 mg/kg/day in divided doses.
D-serine is synthetized by isomerization of L-serine, in a reaction catalyzed by the enzyme serine racemase [24, 25], which, in addition to synthesize D-serine, also catalyzes the [alpha],[beta]-elimination of water from L-serine or D-serine to produce pyruvate and ammonia [26] (Figure 1).
0.03 0.04 0.1 Isoleucine 0.12 0.4 0.4 0.5 L-Arginine 0.15 0.4 0.6 0.6 Leucine 0.22 0.7 0.7 0.8 L-Tyrosine 0.07 0.2 0.2 0.6 Lysine 0.14 0.4 0.6 1 Methionine 0.05 0.2 0.2 0.3 Phenylalanine 0.13 0.4 0.5 0.5 Threonine 0.15 0.4 0.5 0.6 Valine 0.16 0.4 0.5 0.5 Non-Essential Glycine 0.16 0.5 0.6 0.7 Histidine 0.02 0.1 0.2 0.2 L-Alanine 0.18 0.6 0.7 0.7 L-Aspartate 0.29 1 1.2 1.5 L-Glutamate 0.35 0.9 1 1.4 L-Proline 0.13 0.4 0.5 0.5 L-Serine 0.15 0.4 0.5 0.6 Tryptophan nd.
We do something similar if we believe that the adrenal glands or heart need nutritional support, though the items will be different (like possibly food Co-Q10 for heart and plant-source L-serine for adrenals).
L-Serine is an all-natural non-essential amino acid that is found in the human body.
L-serine is an amino acid which is quite literally offensive to most fish and falls into a bracket with more obvious odors like nicotine, sun screen, insect repellents, scented soaps, oil and fuel, etc.
However, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-galactose, and L-serine were also not utilized by all strains studied by Vauterin et al.