lea

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Related to LEAS: leadership, Lease Agreement, Lesa

lea

 (lē, lā) also ley (lā, lē)
n.
A grassland; a meadow.

[Middle English leie, from Old English lēah; see leuk- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lea

(liː)
n
1. (Agriculture) poetic a meadow or field
2. (Agriculture) land that has been sown with grass seed
[Old English lēah; related to German dialect loh thicket]

lea

(liː)
n
1. (Units) a unit for measuring lengths of yarn, usually taken as 80 yards for wool, 120 yards for cotton and silk, and 300 yards for linen
2. (Units) a measure of yarn expressed as the length per unit weight, usually the number of leas per pound
[C14: of uncertain origin]

LEA

(in Britain) abbreviation for
(Education) Local Education Authority
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lea

(li, leɪ)

n.
grassland; meadow.
[before 900; Middle English lege, lei, Old English lēah, c. dial. Dutch loo (as in Waterloo), Old High German lōh, Latin lūcus]

lea.

1. league.
2. leather.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Lea

 a measure of yarn which varies according to type, i.e., worsted [80 yards] or cotton [120 yards], 1399.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lea - a unit of length of thread or yarn
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
yard, pace - a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride
2.lea - a field covered with grass or herbage and suitable for grazing by livestocklea - a field covered with grass or herbage and suitable for grazing by livestock
common land, commons - a pasture subject to common use
cow pasture - a pasture for cows
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life
rural area, country - an area outside of cities and towns; "his poetry celebrated the slower pace of life in the country"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lea

[liː] N (poet) → prado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

LEA

[ˌɛliːˈeɪ] n abbr (British) (=local education authority) → académie f autorité locale chargée de l'enseignement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lea

n (poet)Au(e) f (poet), → Wiesengrund m (liter)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

LEA

[ˌɛliːˈeɪ] n abbr (Brit) =Local Education AuthorityProvveditorato agli Studi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
For a time the Knight said not a word, but a slow red arose into his cheeks; at last he looked Robin in the face and said, "I know not why I should be ashamed, for it should be no shame to me; but, friend, I tell thee the truth, when I say that in my purse are ten shillings, and that that is every groat that Sir Richard of the Lea hath in all the wide world."
Then Robin brought forward Sir Richard of the Lea. "My Lord Bishop," said he, "here is another guest that we have with us this day.
Then Robin turned to Sir Richard of the Lea, and quoth he, "Now, Sir Richard, the church seemed like to despoil thee, therefore some of the overplus of church gains may well be used in aiding thee.
Moreover, if the King's companies keep these prizes, the winning companies shall have, first, two tuns of Rhenish wine; second, two tuns of English beer; and, third, five of the fattest harts that run on Dallom Lea. Methinks that is a princely wager," added King Harry laughingly.
Boy, call hither Sir Richard of the Lea and my lord Bishop of Hereford!"
A large launch, with two standing lugs, lay under the lea of the schooner; and into this the strange assortment of goods were swung.
The green lea was speckled as thickly with them as a canvas by Van Alsloot or Sallaert with burghers.
I devoted some three months to rafting, and, being then as proficient as there was any need to be at that branch of the art, I determined to go in for rowing proper, and joined one of the Lea boating clubs.
Being out in a boat on the river Lea, especially on Saturday afternoons, soon makes you smart at handling a craft, and spry at escaping being run down by roughs or swamped by barges; and it also affords plenty of opportunity for acquiring the most prompt and graceful method of lying down flat at the bottom of the boat so as to avoid being chucked out into the river by passing tow-lines.
* Have slept with the bee - Arouse them my maiden, On moorland and lea - Go !
Their eyes would be sad, and averted from their fate towards the Northern flats, their leader not Isis or Sabrina, but the slowly flowing Lea. No glory of raiment would be theirs, no urgency of dance; but they would be real nymphs.
A picturesque track it was, by the way; lying along the side of the beck and through the sweetest curves of the dale: but that day I thought more of the letters, that might or might not be awaiting me at the little burgh whither I was bound, than of the charms of lea and water.