Leo

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Le·o

 (lē′ō)
n.
1. A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Cancer and Virgo, containing the bright stars Regulus and Denebola.
2.
a. The fifth sign of the zodiac in astrology.
b. One who is born under this sign. In all senses also called Lion.

[Latin Leō, from leō, lion; see lion.]

LEO

abbr.
1. law enforcement officer
2. low earth orbit
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Leo

(ˈliːəʊ)
n
(Animals) a name for a lion, used in children's tales, fables, etc
[from Latin: lion]

Leo

(ˈliːəʊ)
n, Latin genitive Leonis (liːˈəʊnɪs)
1. (Astronomy) astronomy a zodiacal constellation in the N hemisphere, lying between Cancer and Virgo on the ecliptic, that contains the star Regulus and the radiant of the Leonid meteor shower
2. (Astrology) astrology
a. Also called: the Lion the fifth sign of the zodiac, symbol ♌, having a fixed fire classification and ruled by the sun. The sun is in this sign between about July 23 and Aug 22
b. a person born during a period when the sun is in this sign
adj
(Astrology) astrology born under or characteristic of Leo
Also (for senses 2b, 3): Leonian

LEO

abbreviation for
(Astronautics) low earth orbit
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Le•o

(ˈli oʊ)

n., gen. Le•o•nis (liˈoʊ nɪs)
for 1.
1. the Lion, a zodiacal constellation between Virgo and Cancer, containing the bright star Regulus.
2.
a. the fifth sign of the zodiac.
b. a person born under this sign, usu. between July 23 and August 22.

Le•o

(ˈli oʊ, ˈleɪ oʊ)
n.
1. Leo I, Saint ( “Leo the Great” ), A.D. c390–461, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 440–461.
2. Leo III, Saint, A.D. c750–816, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 795–816.
3. Leo X (Giovanni de'Medici), 1475–1521, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1513–21 (son of Lorenzo de'Medici).
4. Leo XIII (Giovanni Vincenzo Pecci), 1810–1903, Italian ecclesiastic: pope 1878–1903.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Le·o

(lē′ō)
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Cancer and Virgo.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Leo - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in LeoLeo - (astrology) a person who is born while the sun is in Leo
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
astrology, star divination - a pseudoscience claiming divination by the positions of the planets and sun and moon
2.Leo - a zodiacal constellation in northern hemisphere between Cancer and Virgo
zodiac - a belt-shaped region in the heavens on either side to the ecliptic; divided into 12 constellations or signs for astrological purposes
Denebola - a star in Leo approximately 43 light years from Earth
Regulus - the brightest star in Leo
3.Leo - the fifth sign of the zodiac; the sun is in this sign from about July 23 to August 22
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Lev
løve
LeijonaLeoJalopeura
LionLéoLéon
lav
Oroszlán
Leo
獅子座
사자자리
Leo
Lev
LejonetLeo
ราศีสิงห์
cung Sư tử

Leo

[ˈliːəʊ] N
1. (= sign, constellation) → Leo m
2. (= person) → leo mf
she's (a) Leoes leo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Leo

[ˈliːəʊ] n
(= sign) → le Lion
born under the sign of Leo → né(e) sous le signe du Lion
(= person) → Lion m
to be Leo → être du Lion, être Lion
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Leo

n (Astrol) → Löwe m; he’s (a) Leoer ist Löwe
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Leo

[ˈliːəʊ] n (Astron, Astrol) → Leone m
to be Leo → essere del Leone
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Leo

بُرْجُ الأَسَدِ Lev løve Löwe Λέων Leo leijona Lion lav Leone 獅子座 사자자리 Leeuw Løven Lew Leão Лев Lejonet ราศีสิงห์ Aslan burcu cung Sư tử 狮子座
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Leo Hunter--is proud to number among her acquaintance all those who have rendered themselves celebrated by their works and talents.
Leo Hunter, Sir, to have the gratification of seeing you at the Den.'
Leo Hunter has many of these breakfasts, Sir,' resumed the new acquaintance--'"feasts of reason," sir, "and flows of soul," as somebody who wrote a sonnet to Mrs.
And call Leo. Where is that Leo!' She pulled them out of corners and came bringing them like a mother cat bringing in her kittens.
When she came to my light-footed friend of the windmill, she said, `This is Leo, and he's old enough to be better than he is.'
Thou knowest the life I have led, keeping each point of my Order, striving with devils embodied and disembodied, striking down the roaring lion, who goeth about seeking whom be may devour, like a good knight and devout priest, wheresoever I met with him even as blessed Saint Bernard hath prescribed to us in the forty-fifth capital of our rule, Ut Leo semper feriatur.* But by the Holy Temple!
Well said our blessed rule, Semper percutiatur leo vorans.
comes Cancer the Crab, and drags us back; and here, going from Virtue, Leo, a roaring Lion, lies in the path --he gives a few fierce bites and surly dabs with his paw; we escape, and hail Virgo, the Virgin!
Feudalism demands to share with theocracy, while awaiting the inevitable arrival of the people, who will assume the part of the lion: Quia nominor leo .
Leonine verses are so called in honor of a poet named Leo, whom prosodists appear to find a pleasure in believing to have been the first to discover that a rhyming couplet could be run into a single line.
As I threw my rifle to my shoulder, I thanked God, the ancient God of my ancestors, that I had replaced the hard-jacketed bullets in my weapon with soft-nosed projectiles, for though this was my first experience with Felis leo, I knew the moment that I faced that charge that even my wonderfully perfected firearm would be as futile as a peashooter unless I chanced to place my first bullet in a vital spot.
"Your excellency is mistaken; there are pirates, like the bandits who were believed to have been exterminated by Pope Leo XII., and who yet, every day, rob travellers at the gates of Rome.