La Niña

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La Ni·ña

 (lä nēn′yä)
n.
A cooling of the ocean surface off the western coast of South America, occurring periodically every 4 to 12 years and affecting Pacific and other weather patterns.

[American Spanish, the girl (to distinguish it from El Niño) : Spanish la, the (from Latin illa, feminine of ille; see al- in Indo-European roots) + niña, daughter (from Old Spanish ninna, from Vulgar Latin *nīnna).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

La Niña

(læ ˈniːnjə)
n
(Physical Geography) meteorol a cooling of the eastern tropical Pacific, occurring in certain years
[C20: from Spanish: The Little Girl, to distinguish it from El Niño]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

La Ni·ña

(lä nēn′yä)
A cooling of the surface water of the eastern and central Pacific Ocean, occurring every 4 to 12 years and causing unusual weather patterns. The cooler water brings drought to western South America and heavy rains to eastern Australia and Indonesia. Compare El Niño.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of this, keeping a close watch on the call-and-response relationship that happens on the eastern Pacific can give people a good indication whether an El Nino or a La Nina is coming.
The researchers found, for example, that the increased wildfire danger in the southwestern United States associated with La Nina events would become more acute, the AGU news release said.
The Met specialist, however, ruled out impact of El Nino or La Nina on Bangladesh.
'We may issue the last La Nina advisory this May,' she said.
According to the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), La Nina still persists in the tropical Pacific but will likely transition to neutral phase, where there is neither La Nina nor El Nino, between March and May.
'Weak La Nina is likely to bring above normal rainfall in different parts of the country in the coming several months,' read the statement from Pagasa administrator Vicente Malano.
There was a La Nina for the early part of last winter.
PAGASA cited above-normal rainfall as an impact of La Nina on the country.
Weather Forecast: La Nina is Here, May Last through Winter