La Tène

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Related to La Tene culture: Keltoi, Hansli Kopp

La Tène

 (lä tĕn′)
adj.
Of or relating to a late Iron Age Celtic civilization dating from the fifth to the first century bc, influenced by contact with Mediterranean civilizations and flourishing throughout most of Europe north of the Alps until the Roman conquests.

[After La Tène, a district at the eastern end of the Lake of Neuchâtel in Switzerland.]

La Tène

(læ ˈtɛn)
adj
(Anthropology & Ethnology) of or relating to a Celtic culture in Europe from about the 5th to the 1st centuries bc, characterized by a distinctive type of curvilinear decoration. See also Hallstatt
[C20: from La Tène, a part of Lake Neuchâtel, Switzerland, where remains of this culture were first discovered]

La Tène

(Fr. la ˈtɛn)
adj.
1. designating the period of the European Iron Age that followed the Hallstatt period, roughly from the 5th century b.c. to the 1st century a.d.
n.
2. a shallow area at the E end of the Lake of Neuchâtel, Switzerland.
[1885–90]

La Tène

Belonging to an Iron Age Celtic culture in Europe dating from the 5th to the 1st century BC, known for a characterictic curvilinear style of decoration used in artifacts.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The burials, which contained a rich array of grave goods, show all the hallmarks of the Celtic La Tene culture, which flourished across Central and Western Europe at the time.
The Hallstatt and La Tene culture bearers who colonised Ireland and Britain during the Bronze Age were a horse-centred society, as is evidenced by archaeological finds of horse gear in bronze, including bits and bridle fittings closely related in form to similar items found throughout Europe and as far eastward as Iran.
Classicists accustomed to Roman descriptions of archetypal German Barbarians will be interested to learn that numerous large walled towns (oppida) like Manching in Bavaria (at 1,000 acres and up to 10,000 inhabitants, by no means the largest), with specialized crafts, coinage; writing, and other trappings of urban civilization were characteristic of La Tene culture in temperate Europe well over a century before the arrival of Caesar.