Labadist


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Labadist

an adherent of Jean de Labadie, a French mystic.
See also: Protestantism
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Basing myself on Michel de Certeau's work and a number of recently published studies on Labadie, I shall examine several factors--among them the attraction to mystical nomadism and alterite--which drew Anna Maria van Schurman to the Labadist sectarian household.
Because of her rejection of the sterile academic theology of Protestant Scholasticism (which she had mastered and continued to use against opponents) and of her joining the Labadist cult to focus on true theology, that is, a deeply felt experiential knowledge of Christ and God, she fell into disfavor in Calvinist circles, yet remained influential, especially among German Pietists and beyond.
The text primarily follows a chronological path through Merian's life: her early training in the Frankfurt family workshop under an artist father, Matthaus Merian the Elder, and stepfather Jakob Marrel; her later family life including marriage to the Nuremburg artist Andreas Graff, the births of her two daughters, and divorce; her religious affiliations and her move to the Labadist community in Wieuwerd; the establishment of the family business in Amsterdam, including a detailed description of collaborative working methods, business practices, and patronage; and her research trip to Suriname with a discussion of the resulting publication in 1705, Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium: Ofte Verandering Der Surinaamsche Insecten, produced after her return to Amsterdam.
The speaker in the title poem finds mutual affirmation within the Labadist commune.
Merian, her mother, and daughters threw in their lot with the Wieuwerd colony in Friesland, Holland, a Labadist communal enterprise supported by soaps, chemical salts, and pills for fevers.
Davis seeks to meet this challenge by positing as the critical turning point Merian's conversion to Pietism, her departure from her husband, and her retirement for five or six years to the Labadist community at Wieuwerd in Friesland.
Married for twenty years, Merian experienced a dramatic religious conversion in 1685, and abruptly left her husband to join the Labadist religious community in Friesland.
Historically, the creation of social policy alternatives has also been the province of small intentional groups (from the Labadist in the seventh century to the Children of God) who came together in search of practical ways to implement their agenda (religious freedom, sexual liberation).
He addressed the "abuse" of learning propagated by Anna Maria Schurmann, who famously joined the Labadists and renounced her studies as earthly vanity.
There is another guide, another ghost beyond Edwards and the Labadists.
Within less than fifty years, the Labadists disappeared almost without a trace.
In Where Angels Fear to Tread, Calverton argued that the efforts of the Labadists, Rappites, Shakers, Mormons, Owenites, Oneidans and many others demonstrated that there was another American dream other than appetitive individualism which those coming to America had sought.