labial

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Related to Labials: Labial consonants, bilabials

la·bi·al

 (lā′bē-əl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the lips or labia.
2. Linguistics Articulated mainly by closing or partly closing the lips, as the sounds (b), (m), or (w).
n.
1. Linguistics A labial consonant.
2. Music See flue1.

[Medieval Latin labiālis, from Latin labium, lip; see leb- in Indo-European roots.]

la′bi·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

labial

(ˈleɪbɪəl)
adj
1. (Anatomy) of, relating to, or near lips or labia
2. (Music, other) music producing sounds by the action of an air stream over a narrow liplike fissure, as in a flue pipe of an organ
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics relating to a speech sound whose articulation involves movement or use of the lips: a labial click.
n
4. (Music, other) music Also called: labial pipe an organ pipe with a liplike fissure
5. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics a speech sound such as English p or m, whose articulation involves movement or use of the lips
[C16: from Medieval Latin labiālis, from Latin labium lip]
ˌlabiˈality n
ˈlabially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

la•bi•al

(ˈleɪ bi əl)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or resembling a labium.
2. of or pertaining to the lips.
3. (of a speech sound) articulated using one or both lips, as the sounds (p), (v), (m), (w), or (o̅o̅).
n.
4. a labial speech sound, esp. a consonant.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin]
la`bi•al′i•ty, n.
la′bi•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.labial - a consonant whose articulation involves movement of the lips
consonant - a speech sound that is not a vowel
bilabial - a consonant that is articulated using both lips; /p/ or /b/ or /w/
labial stop - a stop consonant that is produced with the lips
Adj.1.labial - of or relating to the lips of the mouth; "labial stops"
2.labial - relating to or near the female labium
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
labijalusnenik

labial

[ˈleɪbɪəl]
A. ADJlabial
B. Nlabial f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

labial

adj (Anat, Phon) → labial, Lippen-; labial soundLabial- or Lippenlaut
n (Phon) → Labial- or Lippenlaut m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

la·bi·al

a. labial, rel. a los labios;
___ branches of mental nerveramas labiales del nervio mentoniano;
___ glandsglándulas labiales;
___ herniahernia ___;
___ occlusionoclusión ___;
___ splintférula ___;
___ veinsvenas labiales.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

labial

adj labial
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The labial melody with which the Typee girls carry on an ordinary conversation, giving a musical prolongation to the final syllable of every sentence, and chirping out some of the words with a liquid, bird-like accent, was singularly pleasing.
From two to five o'clock a species of labial telegraphy went on throughout the town; and all the inhabitants learned that Mademoiselle Cormon had at last found a husband by letter, and was about to marry the Vicomte de Troisville.
Finally, Column 11 features the labials or lip consonants (B, F, P) and the "rare-labial series" of V and W (called "double vee" in most languages).
Following this same procedure, the vowel deviation scores are given for all labials and coronals below, shown as a mean of four observations (other place classes are not included because there is only one velar and one glottal).
These numbers accord well with the qualitative statements about exceptions to a general prohibition on two labials in Mosel & Hovdhaugen (1992: 24-25).
Finally, we return to the principal place classes, labials and coronals, to summarize some of the larger findings.
Compare Lorca's original: "Los laberintos/que crea el tiempo/se desvanecen" to Holbrook's: "Lost labials in/colloquial time,/evanesence." Of course, "labials" have nothing to do with Lorca's intended "labyrinths," but that's the point.