welfare economics

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welfare economics

n (functioning as singular)
(Economics) the aspects of economic theory concerned with the welfare of society and priorities to be observed in the allocation of resources
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In Neryungri solemn signing of the Agreement on strategic partnership in the field of labor supply between the five municipal districts of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and Coal mining company "Colmar" took place.
The real estate market will continue to benefit from the country's sustained economic growth this year, but project delays related to the tight labor supply in the construction sector will remain a key challenge, property consulting firm Colliers Philippines said.
The reduction of the labor supply may lead to an increase in the wage level, which will increase production cost and erode competitiveness.
Whether government benefits discourage labor supply by individuals 65 and older, and if so by how much, has attracted research interest since the creation of such transfer programs.
Henry Farber, Princeton University and NBER, "Why You Can't Find a Taxi in the Rain and Other Labor Supply Lessons from Cab Drivers" (NBER Working Paper No.
The volumes are titled as follows: Labor Supply and Labor Demand (v.
While these trends in enrollment may have educational benefits for attendees, they may also affect the labor supply of attendees' parents.
The conventional wisdom is that such extensions have positive effects on the macroeconomy because they have very little effect on labor supply and also increase aggregate demand because unemployed workers have a large marginal propensity to consume any benefits they receive.
Or would the benefits of a flexible labor supply be a boon to our economy, all while raising the standard of living for anyone willing to work?
This immense volume of over twenty essays contains influential essays on labor relations, wages, worker-satisfaction, the effects of unemployment insurance on the labor supply, the effect of uncertainty on the labor supply, schooling and the effects of education on the labor-supply, job mobility among younger men, and more.
When one compares one cyclical peak with the next, thus holding the unemployment rate more or less fixed, the employment-population ratio necessarily reflects the labor force participation rate, which is the common measure of labor supply.
Much has been said about the importance of increasing the labor supply for "middle skills jobs," or those jobs that now (compared to decades past) require more than a high school education but less than a bachelor's degree (e.