lacerate

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Related to Lacerations: wound

lac·er·ate

 (lăs′ə-rāt′)
tr.v. lac·er·at·ed, lac·er·at·ing, lac·er·ates
1. To rip, cut, or tear.
2. To cause deep emotional pain to; distress.
adj. (-rĭt, -rāt′)
1. Torn; mangled.
2. Wounded.
3. Having jagged, deeply cut edges: lacerate leaves.

[Middle English laceraten, from Latin lacerāre, lacerāt-, from lacer, torn.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lacerate

vb (tr)
1. to tear (the flesh, etc) jaggedly
2. to hurt or harrow (the feelings, etc)
adj
having edges that are jagged or torn; lacerated: lacerate leaves.
[C16: from Latin lacerāre to tear, from lacer mangled]
ˈlacerable adj
ˌlaceraˈbility n
ˌlacerˈation n
ˈlacerative adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lac•er•ate

(v. ˈlæs əˌreɪt; adj. -əˌreɪt, -ər ɪt)

v. -at•ed, -at•ing,
adj. v.t.
1. to tear roughly; mangle.
2. to distress or torture mentally or emotionally; wound deeply; pain greatly.
adj.
[1535–45; < Latin lacerātus, past participle of lacerāre to tear up, derivative of lacer mangled]
lac′er•a•ble, adj.
lac`er•a•bil′i•ty, n.
lac′er•a`tive, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lacerate


Past participle: lacerated
Gerund: lacerating

Imperative
lacerate
lacerate
Present
I lacerate
you lacerate
he/she/it lacerates
we lacerate
you lacerate
they lacerate
Preterite
I lacerated
you lacerated
he/she/it lacerated
we lacerated
you lacerated
they lacerated
Present Continuous
I am lacerating
you are lacerating
he/she/it is lacerating
we are lacerating
you are lacerating
they are lacerating
Present Perfect
I have lacerated
you have lacerated
he/she/it has lacerated
we have lacerated
you have lacerated
they have lacerated
Past Continuous
I was lacerating
you were lacerating
he/she/it was lacerating
we were lacerating
you were lacerating
they were lacerating
Past Perfect
I had lacerated
you had lacerated
he/she/it had lacerated
we had lacerated
you had lacerated
they had lacerated
Future
I will lacerate
you will lacerate
he/she/it will lacerate
we will lacerate
you will lacerate
they will lacerate
Future Perfect
I will have lacerated
you will have lacerated
he/she/it will have lacerated
we will have lacerated
you will have lacerated
they will have lacerated
Future Continuous
I will be lacerating
you will be lacerating
he/she/it will be lacerating
we will be lacerating
you will be lacerating
they will be lacerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been lacerating
you have been lacerating
he/she/it has been lacerating
we have been lacerating
you have been lacerating
they have been lacerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been lacerating
you will have been lacerating
he/she/it will have been lacerating
we will have been lacerating
you will have been lacerating
they will have been lacerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been lacerating
you had been lacerating
he/she/it had been lacerating
we had been lacerating
you had been lacerating
they had been lacerating
Conditional
I would lacerate
you would lacerate
he/she/it would lacerate
we would lacerate
you would lacerate
they would lacerate
Past Conditional
I would have lacerated
you would have lacerated
he/she/it would have lacerated
we would have lacerated
you would have lacerated
they would have lacerated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.lacerate - cut or tear irregularly
rupture, tear, snap, bust - separate or cause to separate abruptly; "The rope snapped"; "tear the paper"
2.lacerate - deeply hurt the feelings of; distress; "his lacerating remarks"
spite, bruise, injure, offend, hurt - hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised my ego"
Adj.1.lacerate - irregularly slashed and jagged as if torn; "lacerate leaves"
rough - of the margin of a leaf shape; having the edge cut or fringed or scalloped
2.lacerate - having edges that are jagged from injurylacerate - having edges that are jagged from injury
injured - harmed; "injured soldiers"; "injured feelings"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lacerate

verb
1. tear, cut, wound, rend, rip, slash, claw, maim, mangle, gash, jag Its claws lacerated his thighs.
2. hurt, wound, rend, torture, distress, torment, afflict, harrow He was born into a family already lacerated with tensions and divisions.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

lacerate

[ˈlæsəreɪt] VT (Med) → lacerar; [+ feelings] → herir
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lacerate

[ˈlæsəreɪt] vt (= cut) [+ skin, body, flesh] → lacérer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lacerate

vt
(lit) hand, skinverletzen; clothesaufreißen; (by glass etc) → zerschneiden; (by thorns) → zerkratzen, aufreißen; (by claws, whip) → zerfetzen; he lacerated his armer zog sich (dat)tiefe Wunden am Arm zu; she lacerated her wrist with a razor-bladesie schlitzte sich (dat)die Pulsadern mit einer Rasierklinge auf; her knee was badly laceratedsie hatte tiefe Wunden am Knie
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lacerate

[ˈlæsəˌreɪt] vtlacerare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lacerate

v. lacerar, desgarrar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lacerate

vt lacerar, desgarrar, herir con un golpe cortante
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
The lacerations occurred oftenest in horizontal lines, though there were perpendicular lines as well.
In bed, he could not sleep because of his pain, and hour by hour she worked over him, renewing the hot compresses over his bruises, soothing the lacerations with witch hazel and cold cream and the tenderest of finger tips.
The medical examination disclosed a broken bone and severe bruises and lacerations. So far, Dermody's sufferings were easy of relief.
The throat showed horrible contusions; not mere finger-marks, but bruises and lacerations wrought by two strong hands that must have buried themselves in the yielding flesh, maintaining their terrible grasp until long after death.
Contusions and lacerations are often attended with worse phaenomena, and with more fatal consequences, than fractures.
With the exception of several bad wounds, the rest were merely severe bruises and lacerations. The blow which he had received before going overboard had laid his scalp open several inches.
The first care of the two unspilt friends was to extricate their unfortunate companions from their bed of quickset--a process which gave them the unspeakable satisfaction of discovering that they had sustained no injury, beyond sundry rents in their garments, and various lacerations from the brambles.
They shrink by an ungovernable instinct, as they would shrink from laceration. Adam had brought himself to think of seeing Hetty, if she would consent to see him, because he thought the meeting might possibly be a good to her--might help to melt away this terrible hardness they told him of.
Releasing my hold upon the ivy, I dropped the re-maining distance to the ground, saved from laceration only because the lion's paw struck the thick stem of ivy.
I am to re-open wounds that Time has barely closed; I am to recall the most intensely painful remembrances--and this done, I am to feel myself compensated by a new laceration, in the shape of Mr.
"Ah!" he cried piteously, "a last laceration of my sympathies still remains.
Micawber, much affected, 'you will forgive, and our old and tried friend Copperfield will, I am sure, forgive, the momentary laceration of a wounded spirit, made sensitive by a recent collision with the Minion of Power - in other words, with a ribald Turncock attached to the water-works - and will pity, not condemn, its excesses.'