Laconian


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Laconian

(ləˈkəʊnɪən)
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Laconia, the ancient Greek country of which Sparta was the capital
adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to Laconia or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to Laconia or its inhabitants
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Laconian - a resident of Laconia
Laconia - an ancient region of southern Greece in the southeastern Peloponnesus; dominated by Sparta
Hellene, Greek - a native or inhabitant of Greece
References in classic literature ?
For this reason the Iliad and the Odyssey each furnish the subject of one tragedy, or, at most, of two; while the Cypria supplies materials for many, and the Little Iliad for eight--the Award of the Arms, the Philoctetes, the Neoptolemus, the Eurypylus, the Mendicant Odysseus, the Laconian Women, the Fall of Ilium, the Departure of the Fleet.
First they passed by Malea, and then along the Laconian coast they came to Taenarum, sea-garlanded town and country of Helios who gladdens men, where the thick- fleeced sheep of the lord Helios feed continually and occupy a glad-some country.
(76) A more detailed instance appears in 412/1, when the Spartan Hippocrates was sent out with one Laconian and eleven Sicilian ships to Cnidus on the Ionian coast.
Opportunities are opening up here for return-to-the-land holidays where visitors can savour the relaxed Laconian lifestyle.
Gozlan takes a Laconian perspective that enables him to explore the space between the clinic and culture and the arts to understand the dilemmas of sexual differences.
(24.) This evokes Andromache's designation of Hermione as Spartan (Laconian) (Euripides, Andr.
pattern as the Laconian key, whose creation they attributed to the
The well-known and much debated obstacle to this idea is the digamma attested in Helen's name (e.g., in Laconian SEG 26.457, 7th cent.; see West 2007: 231 n.
One reason for doubt is that the Republic characterises the Laconian as one of the four defective constitutions (544a1-3, c2-3), a city loving honour and victory (545a) rather than wisdom.
Eight papers from the seminar explore elements of the Spartan bestiary in the archaic and classical periods; divinity, royalty, and insecurity in classical Sparta; Sparta and the politics of nudity; Laconian black-figure pottery and Spartan elite consumption; the ghost of the Lakedaimonin state; the portrayal of the Lycurgan piliteia in Ephorus' Histories; how women policed masculine behavior in archaic and classical Sparta; and Sparta and Nazi Germany in mid-20th-century British liberal and left-wing thought.
She held leadership roles in the Greek Orthodox Church, the Daughters of Penelope, the Philoptochus Society and the Laconian Society.
And more than once we get tangled up in fairly erudite theorizing that risks distracting attention from the bigger picture, as on the elusive pre-Cleisthenic "naukraries." I cannot bring myself to accept his theory that the unification of Attica was delayed until the end of the sixth century, or that before Cleisthenes's constitutional reforms of 508, "the rural Attic settlements of the paralia and mesogaia were regarded as perioikic communities" on the Laconian model (p.