laconic

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la·con·ic

 (lə-kŏn′ĭk)
adj.
Using or marked by the use of few words; terse or concise.

[Latin Lacōnicus, Spartan, from Greek Lakōnikos, from Lakōn, a Spartan (from the reputation of the Spartans for brevity of speech).]

la·con′i·cal·ly adv.
Synonyms: laconic, reticent, taciturn, tightlipped
These adjectives describe people who are sparing with speech. Laconic denotes terseness or conciseness in expression, but when applied to people it often implies an unwillingness to use words: "Mountain dwellers and mountain lovers are a laconic tribe. They know the futility of words" (Edna Ferber).
Reticent suggests a reluctance to share one's thoughts and feelings: "She had been shy and reticent with me, and now ... she was telling me aloud the secrets of her inmost heart" (W.H. Hudson).
Taciturn implies unsociableness and a tendency to speak only when it is absolutely necessary: "At the Council board he was taciturn; and in the House of Lords he never opened his lips" (Thomas Macaulay).
Tightlipped strongly implies a steadfast unwillingness to divulge information being sought: He remained tightlipped when asked about his personal life.
Word History: The city of Sparta, the main city of the region of Laconia in the very south of mainland Greece, vied with Athens for the domination of Greece in ancient times. In order to foster and maintain a martial spirit, the Spartan upper classes endured a regimented life whose rigor was a source of amazement to their fellow Greeks. Once, when someone asked why the Spartans did not have magnificent city walls like other Greek cities, the Spartan king Agesilaus simply pointed to his fellow citizens, armed to the teeth, the most formidable soldiers in Greece: "Here are the walls of the Spartans." The austere life of the Spartan people is still remembered today when English speakers use the adjective spartan to describe a frugal meal or an ascetic lifestyle. The Spartans trained the mind as well as the body, and their speech was as pointed as their spears. The English adjective laconic, from Greek Lakōn "an inhabitant of Laconia, a Spartan," reflects the Spartan reputation for incisive brevity when speaking and the value they placed on not mincing words.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

laconic

(ləˈkɒnɪk) or

laconical

adj
(of a person's speech) using few words; terse
[C16: via Latin from Greek Lakōnikos, from Lakōn Laconian, Spartan; referring to the Spartans' terseness of speech]
laˈconically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

la•con•ic

(ləˈkɒn ɪk)

adj.
using few words; terse; concise: a laconic reply.
[1580–90; < Latin Lacōnicus < Greek Lakōnikós Laconian =Lákōn a Laconian + -ikos -ic]
la•con′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.laconic - brief and to the point; effectively cut short; "a crisp retort"; "a response so curt as to be almost rude"; "the laconic reply; `yes'"; "short and terse and easy to understand"
concise - expressing much in few words; "a concise explanation"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

laconic

adjective terse, short, brief, clipped, to the point, crisp, compact, concise, curt, succinct, pithy, monosyllabic, sententious Usually so laconic in the office, he seemed more relaxed.
rambling, long-winded, wordy, voluble, loquacious, verbose
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

laconic

adjective
Marked by or consisting of few words that are carefully chosen:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
lakoničanlakonski
lakonikusszófukarszűkszavú
lakoniczny
lakonisk

laconic

[ləˈkɒnɪk] ADJlacónico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

laconic

[ləˈkɒnɪk] adjlaconique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

laconic

adjlakonisch; prose, styleknapp
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

laconic

[ləˈkɒnɪk] adjlaconico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The laconic phrase contained an element of the raw truth that for Germans many things had indeed ended and therefore some kind of beginning appeared as a simple and logical necessity.
'Because they'd sell!' replied this master of the laconic phrase -a man as canny in the kitchen as he was on the stage.
Then I discovered that my neighbors and cousins--people of stories and notions, people of speech cherished and passed along--split my grandfather into a million atoms and distributed him over hill-farms and villages through a hundred faces into a thousand laconic phrases.