lactose intolerance

(redirected from Lactase persistence)
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Noun1.lactose intolerance - congenital disorder consisting of an inability to digest milk and milk products; absence or deficiency of lactase results in an inability to hydrolyze lactose
Translations
laktosintolerans
References in periodicals archive ?
This lactase persistence is prevalent only in some populations around the world such as in Northern Europe.
The findings provide strong evidence that lactase persistence evolved in human populations as a dietary adaptation.
Mark presented on the issue of "Lapsed Vegetarians" at NAVS Vegetarian Summerfest, and recently researched the genetics and history of lactase persistence and how official attitudes toward dairy in the U.
Among the topics are inferring processes of Neolithic gene-culture co-evolution using genetic and archaeological data: the case of lactase persistence and dairying, evaluating the appearance and spread of domestic caprines in the southern Levant, early stock-keeping in Greece, the origin of stock-keeping and spread of animal exploitation strategies in the Early and Middle Neolithic of the North European Plain, and zoological data from Late Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Switzerland about 6000-3500 BC, and earlier Neolithic subsistence in Britain and Ireland as seen through faunal remains and stable isotopes.
These changes underpinned the evolution of Lactase Persistence (LP) amongst modern Europeans, while the multi-billion Euro modern dairy economy is a direct consequence of human-induced biological reformulations made in this critical phase in European prehistory.
Especially compelling is a segment on lactase persistence, in which Dr.
The new find will also help shed light on how humans evolved tolerance for milk thanks to the lactase persistence gene, which seemed to arise around the time that people began consuming milk products, according to Dunne.
A worldwide correlation of lactase persistence phenotype and genotypes.