Lagrangian point

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La·gran·gi·an point

 (lə-grān′jē-ən)
n.
Astronomy Any of five points in the orbital plane of two bodies, one of which is much larger than the other, at which a third, even smaller body will remain in gravitational equilibrium. Bodies located at Lagrangian points appear stationary with respect to the larger two bodies. Also called Lagrange point.

[After Comte Joseph Louis Lagrange.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lagrangian point

n
(Astronomy) astronomy one of five points in the plane of revolution of two bodies in orbit around their common centre of gravity, at which a third body of negligible mass can remain in equilibrium with respect to the other two bodies
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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It will be positioned near the second Lagrange point (L2) of the Earth-Sun system.
These structures would hover around Earth at the Lagrange point - the altitude at which the Moon and Earth exert equal-but-opposite gravitational forces.
Then finally, on Saturday the Russian space agency successfully launched it out of Earth's orbit and onto the (https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/resources/754/what-is-a-lagrange-point/) L2 Lagrange point.
Roscosmos said the telescope, named Spektr-RG, was delivered into a parking orbit before a final burn Saturday that kicked the spacecraft out of Earth's orbit and on to its final destination: the L2 Lagrange point, according to the Associated Press (AP).
Spektr-RG will next navigate to a stable orbit in space called a Lagrange point (specifically, L2), where the gravitational forces of two large objects -- in this case, the sun and the Earth -- balance each other out.
As per the observatory's schedule, Spektr-RG will cruise to the Lagrange Point 2 located 1.5 million kilometres from Earth before beginning a 4-year all sky survey.
The so-called Lagrange Point, also known as L1 appears to be the best.
NASA Planetary Science Division director Jim Green stated that a powerful magnetic bipole placed at Mars' L1 Lagrange Point could deflect solar winds.
DSCOVR recently reached its station about a million miles away between the Earth and the sun at a Lagrange point, where gravitational fields of Earth and Sun cancel out.
DSCOVR will travel to the so-called Lagrange point, or L1, a spot 1 million miles from Earth and 92 million miles from the sun, where the gravity fields are neutralized.