Laingian


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Laingian

(ˈlæŋɪən)
adj
(Psychiatry) of or based on R. D. Laing's theory that mental illnesses are understandable as natural responses to stress in family and social situations
n
(Psychiatry) a follower or adherent of Laing's teaching
References in periodicals archive ?
In Laingian terms, particular acts of translation expose the essential untranslatability of experience, especially across different cultural paradigms.
There are two articles on Les Miserables: Jacques Seebacher relates topographical references in the novel to Hugo's travels, particularly around the time of Leopoldine's death; Fiona Cox applies Laingian analysis to the mentality of Javert.
The Jongs attended a psychoanalytic conference in Vienna, where Erica met a sexy, walleyed British Laingian hippie analyst.
This would appear to take the psychiatrist's medical goal to its logical if unorthodox extreme--to empathize so totally with the psychiatrically ill as to cross into and inhabit his world of neurosis and mental instability, and so temporarily to become the deranged other and to view the world from his perspective (another Laingian concept, of course).
Paul Bowles: The Inner Geography, written by Wayne Pounds, was published in 1985 and uses Freudian and Laingian psychological models to examine Bowles's work.
At this moment, age and gender politics cross paths to form a complex trajectory, a Laingian spiral, a knot (Laing 1970, 1972).
A number of ground-breaking submissions by doctoral researchers reflect current thinking across a range of areas of practice: Rachel Osbourne, for example, offers a critique of the use of psychopathological conceptualisations of paranoia in counselling psychology practice; Monica Lawson outlines how Open Dialogue can be used as an 'applied Laingian practice'; Amir Tarsha reflects on social media-induced anxiety from the perspective of existential practice.
His treatment of Lessing is particularly fine, focusing sharply on her use of Freudian and Laingian psychology in the creation of alternate realities in novels starting with The Four-Gated City (1969) and extending through the work of the next decade.
However, Open Dialogue appears pervaded with Laingian influence.
It should be noted that I am a father, and an academic with several degrees, and have undergone many years of Laingian psychotherapy.
It may explain why one member of the Editorial Board wrote to me, and circulated widely, an abusive and scatological email denouncing me for having invited Szasz to speak at an Inner Circle Seminar in 2003; and why another member of the Editorial Board wrote to me, and also circulated widely, an email demanding to know what, in view of my invitation to Szasz, I was doing on the Advisory Board of the Society for Laingian Studies (he had himself invited me).