laissez-faire

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lais·sez faire

also lais·ser faire  (lĕs′ā fâr′, lā′zā)
n.
1. An economic doctrine that opposes governmental regulation of or interference in commerce beyond the minimum necessary for a free-enterprise system to operate according to its own economic laws.
2. Noninterference in the affairs of others.

[French : laissez, second person pl. imperative of laisser, to let, allow + faire, to do.]

lais′sez-faire′ adj.

laissez-faire

The doctrine of leaving economic activity to market forces free of government interference.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.laissez-faire - with minimally restricted freedom in commerce
capitalistic, capitalist - favoring or practicing capitalism

laissez-faire

laisser-faire
noun nonintervention, free trade, individualism, free enterprise, live and let live the doctrine of laissez-faire and unbridled individualism
Translations

laissez-faire

[ˌleɪseɪˈfɛər ˌlɛseɪˈfɛər]
nlaisser-faire m
modif [policy, approach] → de laisser-faire

laissez-faire

adj (Econ) → Laisser-faire-; (fig)leger, lax; laissez-faire economicsLaisser-faire-Wirtschaftspolitik f

laissez-faire

[ˌlɛseɪˈfɛəʳ]
1. nliberismo
2. adjliberistico/a
References in periodicals archive ?
"Not everything can be left to laissez-faire economics, and sustainability [needs more]," Kane added.
On the far right, for example, protectionists dominate, but there are also free traders who combine laissez-faire economics with virulent anti-immigrant sentiment.
Focusing on the UK, this book debunks nine myths about the Victorian era: Victorians were sexual prudes; Victorian women remained in the home; families were both better and worse than modern ones; Victorians lacked a sense of humor; there was a lot of crime; Victorian Britain had little racial mixing or immigration; the economy succeeded because of laissez-faire economics; Victorians favored diplomatic isolation; and the Victorian period was unusually peaceful.
The failure to follow classical liberal free trade policies--well discussed by Moser--followed an earlier abandonment of the laissez-faire economics developed in the Anglo-American tradition by Adam Smith and disciples, in the French tradition by J.B.
"What makes this country great is the constitution and laissez-faire economics. This is the absolute opposite--it's like a police state."
As they argue, thinkers such as Friedrich Hayek and Ayn Rand actively worked to popularise individualism and self-interest (the latter being the acceptable face of selfishness); and Rand in particular shared with Margaret Thatcher the ability to 'infuse laissez-faire economics with deeply moral convictions centred on the importance of individual character' (indeed, as they point out, it was Ayn Rand who first wrote that 'there is no such entity as "society"').
Consider Jones' description of neoliberalism's evolution from the late 1940s to the '70s: "The early neoliberals were marked by their desire to move beyond both laissez-faire economics and the New Deal.
Their laissez-faire economics insists that 'The markets should sort them out'.
"We suggest that free market ideology was more important for climate science than conspiratorial thinking for two reasons: First, climate science has arguably become more politicized than other sciences, and second, given the fundamental importance of fossil fuels (and hence CO2 emissions) to contemporary economies, climate science presents a far greater threat to laissez-faire economics," the study noted.
Over the past three decades, laissez-faire economics has had an immense impact on our society, mostly for the worse.
From Adam Smith to Margaret Thatcher to Peter Hitchens, or any other present-day rightwing ideologue, it has long been argued that laissez-faire economics work best.
Government has gotten "in the way" because the results of laissez-faire economics demanded it.