Lakota

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La·ko·ta

 (lə-kō′tə)
n. pl. Lakota or La·ko·tas
1. A member of the largest and westernmost of the Sioux, made up of seven groups including the Oglala, Hunkpapa, Brulé, Miniconjou, and Sihasapa. The Lakota became nomadic buffalo hunters after migrating westward in the 1700s and figured prominently in the resistance to white encroachment on the northern Great Plains.
2. The Siouan language of the Lakota. In both senses also called Teton, Teton Sioux. See Usage Note at Nakota.

[Lakota lakxota, allies.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

La•ko•ta

or La•kho•ta

(ləkˈoʊtə)

n., pl. -tas, (esp. collectively) -ta.
1. a member of a Plains Indian people, the westernmost branch of the Dakota.
2. the dialect of Dakota spoken by the Lakotas.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lakota - a member of the large western branch of Sioux people which was made up of several groups that lived on the plains
Brule - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Hunkpapa - a member of the Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux and who formerly lived in the western Dakotas; they were prominent in resisting the white encroachment into the northern Great Plains
Miniconju - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Ogalala, Oglala - a member of the Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux and who formerly inhabited the Black Hills of western South Dakota
Sihasapa - a member of a group of Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Siouan, Sioux - a member of a group of North American Indian peoples who spoke a Siouan language and who ranged from Lake Michigan to the Rocky Mountains
Two Kettle - a member of the Siouan people who constituted a division of the Teton Sioux
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Airbus has delivered more than 420 Lakotas since the UH-72A was competitively selected in 2005.
This visually appealing work for general readers, students, and scholars catalogs 157 items worn, used, and eventually left behind by a group of 15 Lakotas performing dances and marksmanship in traditional costumes at the 1935 Brussels International Exposition in Belgium.
The Dawes Act of 1887 and the reservation system dramatically changed daily life and political dynamics, particularly for the Oglala Lakotas. "Welcome to the Oglala Nation: A Documentary Reader in Oglala Lakota Political History", compiled with commentary and deftly edited by Akim D.
And this gentleman's dream, and quite probably many of his associates, is to visit the Lakotas next year and live with them.
In December of 1925, a substantial group of Oglala Lakotas from Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota came to England with Miller Brothers' 101 Ranch Wild West Show and performed in Bertram Mills' Christmas Circus at Olympia, London.
Airbus, EADS EADS North America Awarded $181.8 Million Army Contract Option for 34 UH-72A Lakotas. The U.S.
The Lakotas and the Black Hills: The Struggle for Sacred Ground.
Army officials have swapped out 23 state-side Blackhawks with Lakotas, which are now participating in combat and medical evacuation operations at the National Training Center in Fort Irwin, Calif., and transporting senior leaders and distinguished guests at various Army installations across the nation.
Broken Treaties: United States and Canadian Relations with the Lakotas and the Plains Cree, 1868-1885, by Jill St.
He totally misread the white man's opinion of him, and it was little wonder: After five years of being relentlessly hounded from Nebraska to Canada by the US Army, he and his near-starving band of Hunkpapa Lakotas surrendered at Fort Buford in Dakota Territory.
Hand in hand with the expectation of generosity is the concept of "Indian Pricing." "Within the Lakota community, it was common for small business producers to have different sets of prices, consisting of a sliding scale for Lakotas and a higher fixed price for non-Indians." (Pickering, 2000, p.40).